Author Topic: Ardennes Yeast  (Read 2057 times)

Offline gmac

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Ardennes Yeast
« on: February 22, 2012, 08:58:59 AM »
I bought some Ardennes yeast to make a Belgian Dark Strong and I haven't been able to get around to make it. 
For a 1.100 gravity beer, Mr. Malty says I need a minimum of 3 packets in a 6 L starter.  I don't have 3 packets. 
My thought was to make 3 gallons of beer, not sure what.  Belgian Pale maybe.  But how do I figure out if this is enough starter?  That's 12L, I would think it would be lots but I have no idea. 
Or would I be better off to make a 1 L starter and put this in and then put it into a 10L starter (no hops etc) with the intention of dumping it (I would do it in my carboy and then pour the wort directly on top of this yeast cake since it seems like less chance of contamination and there's no hop residue to get rid of).
Thanks

Online morticaixavier

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Re: Ardennes Yeast
« Reply #1 on: February 22, 2012, 09:51:58 AM »
I bought some Ardennes yeast to make a Belgian Dark Strong and I haven't been able to get around to make it. 
For a 1.100 gravity beer, Mr. Malty says I need a minimum of 3 packets in a 6 L starter.  I don't have 3 packets. 
My thought was to make 3 gallons of beer, not sure what.  Belgian Pale maybe.  But how do I figure out if this is enough starter?  That's 12L, I would think it would be lots but I have no idea. 
Or would I be better off to make a 1 L starter and put this in and then put it into a 10L starter (no hops etc) with the intention of dumping it (I would do it in my carboy and then pour the wort directly on top of this yeast cake since it seems like less chance of contamination and there's no hop residue to get rid of).
Thanks

Make 5 gallons of ~1.035 belgian pale with one smack pack direct pitched, or you could make a starter but I think you would be fine with direct pitch.

when it's ready rack to keg and put chilled 1.100 BDS wort on the cake. I wouldn't waste 3 gallons of wort just for a big cake when you could make a nice session ale with the same amount of effort. You could even do an extract batch for the 'starter' if you want to cut down on effort.

**EDIT**

I never worry about the gunk when repitching a big beer on the cake. I can't say if this is a good or not but I find it works well.
"Creativity is the residue of wasted time" - A. Einstein

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Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Ardennes Yeast
« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2012, 09:55:12 AM »
I would go with the three gallons of Belgian pale or maybe a blonde. 

I brewed up a Belgian blonde last weekend as the starter for my quad.  Turning 40 this year, so I need to get that beer brewed, kegged and aging so it's ready for the party.

On another note, I prefer Ardennes in lighter beers but it may work well with a dark strong.  I used it in a dubble and, while it certainly wasn't bad, I much preferred the batch I fermented with the Chimay strain.
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Offline firedog23

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Re: Ardennes Yeast
« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2012, 10:01:01 AM »
I have this strain coming up next but I have never used it. My plan is a farmhouse or something similar. Is it a fairly versatile strain?
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Offline gmac

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Re: Ardennes Yeast
« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2012, 10:06:16 AM »
On another note, I prefer Ardennes in lighter beers but it may work well with a dark strong.  I used it in a dubble and, while it certainly wasn't bad, I much preferred the batch I fermented with the Chimay strain.

First of all good luck with the birthday party.

This yeast was a suggestion for an attempt at Unibroue 17 because the actual strain I need Canadian/Belgian isn't available until fall at the earliest.  This is just a shot in the dark at a beer I liked when I tried it back during the holidays.
I will make a Belgian blonde and then go for the big beer.
Thanks

Offline hokerer

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Re: Ardennes Yeast
« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2012, 10:16:15 AM »
Make 5 gallons of ~1.035 belgian pale with one smack pack direct pitched, or you could make a starter but I think you would be fine with direct pitch.
when it's ready rack to keg and put chilled 1.100 BDS wort on the cake. I wouldn't waste 3 gallons of wort just for a big cake when you could make a nice session ale with the same amount of effort. You could even do an extract batch for the 'starter' if you want to cut down on effort.

**EDIT**

I never worry about the gunk when repitching a big beer on the cake. I can't say if this is a good or not but I find it works well.

+1, I did almost exactly that the past couple weeks.  Made a 5.5G Belgian Pale and then, two weeks later, bottled it and dumped a Belgian Quad right on top of the yeast cake (gunk and all).  Only difference in my case is I'm trying out WY3787 Trappist High Gravity.
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Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Ardennes Yeast
« Reply #6 on: February 22, 2012, 10:40:59 AM »
On another note, I prefer Ardennes in lighter beers but it may work well with a dark strong.  I used it in a dubble and, while it certainly wasn't bad, I much preferred the batch I fermented with the Chimay strain.

First of all good luck with the birthday party.

This yeast was a suggestion for an attempt at Unibroue 17 because the actual strain I need Canadian/Belgian isn't available until fall at the earliest.  This is just a shot in the dark at a beer I liked when I tried it back during the holidays.
I will make a Belgian blonde and then go for the big beer.
Thanks

Thanks.

Like I said, it might work fine in a darker beer.  I tend to use it for tripels.  It's a nice yeast and makes a great tripel.

With the dubbel, it may just be that the flavors I expect are what you get with the Chimay strain.  It definitely was a good beer.  Without a side-by-side comparison I wouldn't have any complaints.

Love the Unibroue beers.  La Fin du Monde is my favorite.
It's all in the reflexes. - Jack Burton

Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Ardennes Yeast
« Reply #7 on: February 22, 2012, 10:42:43 AM »
+1, I did almost exactly that the past couple weeks.  Made a 5.5G Belgian Pale and then, two weeks later, bottled it and dumped a Belgian Quad right on top of the yeast cake (gunk and all).  Only difference in my case is I'm trying out WY3787 Trappist High Gravity.

This is exactly what I'm doing for my quad, but with 6 gallons of blonde as a starter.  Same yeast, which I haven't used in years.
It's all in the reflexes. - Jack Burton

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Re: Ardennes Yeast
« Reply #8 on: February 22, 2012, 10:43:10 AM »
I have this strain coming up next but I have never used it. My plan is a farmhouse or something similar. Is it a fairly versatile strain?

I agree with the comments about a dark strong with 3522.  I absolutely love that yeast and use it a lot, but it has a tartness to it that I don't generally care for in darker beers.  I love it in things that are lighter and it's my go to yeast for Belgo/American IPA.
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Offline denny

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Re: Ardennes Yeast
« Reply #9 on: February 22, 2012, 10:43:41 AM »
+1, I did almost exactly that the past couple weeks.  Made a 5.5G Belgian Pale and then, two weeks later, bottled it and dumped a Belgian Quad right on top of the yeast cake (gunk and all).  Only difference in my case is I'm trying out WY3787 Trappist High Gravity.

This is exactly what I'm doing for my quad, but with 6 gallons of blonde as a starter.  Same yeast, which I haven't used in years.

3787 is my favorite Belgian yeast.
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Offline gmac

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Re: Ardennes Yeast
« Reply #10 on: April 10, 2012, 08:17:18 AM »
it's my go to yeast for Belgo/American IPA.
Denny, can you explain to me what a Belgo/American IPA is? 

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Ardennes Yeast
« Reply #11 on: April 10, 2012, 08:51:08 AM »
it's my go to yeast for Belgo/American IPA.
Denny, can you explain to me what a Belgo/American IPA is?

It's an IPA made with Belgian yeast an American hops.  I use pils malt, a bit of 20L crystal and no sugar. 



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Offline gmac

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Re: Ardennes Yeast
« Reply #12 on: April 10, 2012, 09:00:49 AM »
it's my go to yeast for Belgo/American IPA.
Denny, can you explain to me what a Belgo/American IPA is?

It's an IPA made with Belgian yeast an American hops.  I use pils malt, a bit of 20L crystal and no sugar. 
I ask because I have a pitch of Ardennes yeast ready and I'm not sure what to do with it.  I was considering a pale but I may give this a go.  Roughly how many IBU's do you shoot for in this "style"?  Would just Centennial work?  That's what I have the most of although I do have a bit of Citra and Amarillo.  Maybe some Cascade in the fridge somewhere too but I know I've got lots of Centennial.

How's this sound?
9 lbs Pils malt
0.5 lbs C 15 (no 20 on hand)
1.5 oz Centennial at 60
1 oz Centennial at 15
1 oz Centennial at flameout.



Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Ardennes Yeast
« Reply #13 on: April 10, 2012, 10:47:18 AM »
I have this strain coming up next but I have never used it. My plan is a farmhouse or something similar. Is it a fairly versatile strain?
Very versatile. It works well on many types of Belgian beer.  It is the Achouffe strain, WY-3522 WLP-550.

The local brewers say that is what Jolly Pumpkin uses as the primary strain in the fermenter on most of their beers, before they go into the barrels.
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Offline denny

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Ardennes Yeast
« Reply #14 on: April 10, 2012, 11:19:28 AM »
it's my go to yeast for Belgo/American IPA.
Denny, can you explain to me what a Belgo/American IPA is?

It's an IPA made with Belgian yeast an American hops.  I use pils malt, a bit of 20L crystal and no sugar. 
I ask because I have a pitch of Ardennes yeast ready and I'm not sure what to do with it.  I was considering a pale but I may give this a go.  Roughly how many IBU's do you shoot for in this "style"?  Would just Centennial work?  That's what I have the most of although I do have a bit of Citra and Amarillo.  Maybe some Cascade in the fridge somewhere too but I know I've got lots of Centennial.

How's this sound?
9 lbs Pils malt
0.5 lbs C 15 (no 20 on hand)
1.5 oz Centennial at 60
1 oz Centennial at 15
1 oz Centennial at flameout.

I shoot for the same specs as my regular AIPA.  Mid 70s for both gravity and IBU.


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