Author Topic: Fusel Alcohol and Re pitching?  (Read 2549 times)

Offline erockrph

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Re: Fusel Alcohol and Re pitching?
« Reply #15 on: July 11, 2014, 02:05:36 AM »
Please consider giving a "History of Yeast" talk at the next NHC. This is some truly fascinating info.
Eric B.

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Offline 69franx

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Re: Fusel Alcohol and Re pitching?
« Reply #16 on: July 11, 2014, 02:22:37 AM »
I know I saw it somewhere, but what is your background S Cerevisiae? All this yeast info cannot just be a hobby, or reading to satisfy your curiosity. Your career must involve yeast in some way. Most of what you post is way beyond my newbie status, but I read every word, hoping to retain at least a bit of it! Thank you for all the info you bring to this forum


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Fermenting: Ringler Pilsner (thanx Ron)
Conditioning: BVIP (thanx Denny)
In keg: Traquair House Clone (Skotrat style)
In the works:  Czech Dark Lager, American Pale Ale

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Re: Fusel Alcohol and Re pitching?
« Reply #17 on: July 11, 2014, 03:33:59 AM »
Believe or not, studying yeast is actually a hobby.  However, it is the hobby that really drew me into the home brewing hobby.  Without yeast, home brewing would have been little more than a passing fad. I plated my first brewing yeast culture in 1993.  I brewed and maintained a yeast bank on agar slants for a decade before taking an extended hiatus from the hobby.  It was my desire to play with yeast again that drew me back into the hobby.

With respect to yeast genetics, well, my B.S. and M.S. degrees are in computer science (the computer engineering side of computer science).  Bioinformatics is an area of computer science in which I have professional interest. 

With that said, I did not wake up one day and know all of this information.  It was a matter of applying myself over an extended period of time.  I have basically passed the 10,000 hour mark that Malcom Gladwell writes about in his book entitled "Outliers: The Story of Success."  A.J. DeLange is an electrical engineer by training, John Palmer is a metallurgical engineer by training, and Charlie Papazian is a nuclear engineer by training, but they all managed to become experts in areas of brewing that are completely unrelated to their formal training.


Offline narcout

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Re: Fusel Alcohol and Re pitching?
« Reply #18 on: July 11, 2014, 05:16:18 PM »

After you connect NCYC 1026 to 69-53, what's the next step that connects 69-53 to S-04/1098/007?

There is a table in the upper left-hand quadrant of page 50 in this PDF that states that NCYC 1026 is a Whitbread B equivalent:  http://www.red-ts.com/images/products/11%20DEQ%20NCYC.pdf

Do you know what the Wyeast or White Labs equivalents are of the other yeasts in that table?  Does NCYC 240 = Wyeast 1099?

    
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Re: Fusel Alcohol and Re pitching?
« Reply #19 on: July 11, 2014, 11:07:20 PM »
After you connect NCYC 1026 to 69-53, what's the next step that connects 69-53 to S-04/1098/007?

Micheal Lewis is the godfather of craftbrewing in the United States.  The list of his former students reads like a Who's Who of the craft brewing industry (Mitch Steele went through Micheal Lewis' program).  It's only logical that he seeded the industry with yeast cultures with which he was familiar.   

With that said, it was an open secret that Wyeast 1098 was Whitbread B in the early nineties

Do you know what the Wyeast or White Labs equivalents are of the other yeasts in that table?  Does NCYC 240 = Wyeast 1099?

Other than Whitbread B, I do not believe that any of the other top 10 NCYC yeast strains reside in the Wyeast or White Labs collections.  The Wyeast and White Labs cultures are almost all from production breweries.  Whitbread B is a very popular yeast strain that is still in use in many breweries throughout the world.

I am fairly certain that Wyeast 1099 is not NCYC 240.  NCYC 240 is from the old Taylor Walker Brewery.  Taylor Walker was a London porter brewer.  NCYC 240 is a popular strain within the research community because it produces an enzyme called benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase.   Wyeast 1099 is allegedly Whitbread's A strain.

By the way, if you take the time to read the information available on each of the brewing strains in NCYC's collection, you will discover that many cultures carry a Whitbread accession number.  Like Anheuser Busch, Whitbread collected yeast cultures from other breweries.