Author Topic: Help me salvage a brew  (Read 1040 times)

Offline marshall1

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Help me salvage a brew
« on: May 17, 2016, 06:22:18 PM »
I brewed a watermelon pa that has a bitter after taste or on the back of the tongue its bitter, tastes like watermelon rind. Was wondering is there something I can do, or something that has worked in similar situation. I just put it in the secondary, I will also be kegging it. I read something about someone adding some ruby red grapefruit juice to the keg, was thinking that might cover or balance  it out. Thank you

Offline kramerog

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Re: Help me salvage a brew
« Reply #1 on: May 17, 2016, 06:31:44 PM »
The sweetness of the juice could balance the bitterness, but a less bitter juice might be better.  The easiest way to test would be to mix a little juice in a glass of beer.

You could also try dry hopping to cover unpleasant bitterness with pleasant bitterness. 

Offline pete b

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Re: Help me salvage a brew
« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2016, 06:37:46 PM »
I have had overly bitter beers mellow out over time, so maybe just wait. The grapefruit juice in the keg seems weird unless you want it to taste like grapefruit but that's just adding more bitterness and the juice will dry it out more, which in my mind will exacerbate bitterness (I think more malt body/mouthfeel balances or is a counterpoint to bitterness while dryness enhances or exacerbates bitterness).
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Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: Help me salvage a brew
« Reply #3 on: May 18, 2016, 08:32:19 PM »
Acidity can mask some bitterness so I guess I understand where the grapefruit juice idea is going. I would try it out in a glass before committing to a full batch. The bitterness you're getting might not hide behind the acidity in the fruit juice. It could make the beer less palatable.
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Offline pete b

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Re: Help me salvage a brew
« Reply #4 on: May 18, 2016, 08:48:14 PM »
Acidity can mask some bitterness so I guess I understand where the grapefruit juice idea is going. I would try it out in a glass before committing to a full batch. The bitterness you're getting might not hide behind the acidity in the fruit juice. It could make the beer less palatable.
I'm thinking it will ferment in the keg and dry out, so I don't think you will get the same profile as mixing it in a glass.
Don't let the bastards cheer you up.

Offline Wort-H.O.G.

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Re: Help me salvage a brew
« Reply #5 on: May 18, 2016, 08:56:27 PM »
Acidity can mask some bitterness so I guess I understand where the grapefruit juice idea is going. I would try it out in a glass before committing to a full batch. The bitterness you're getting might not hide behind the acidity in the fruit juice. It could make the beer less palatable.
I'm thinking it will ferment in the keg and dry out, so I don't think you will get the same profile as mixing it in a glass.

ale yeast and serving temps should be ok to add juice if it works..shouldn't/likely wouldn't ferment anymore.
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Offline brewinhard

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Re: Help me salvage a brew
« Reply #6 on: May 18, 2016, 10:46:54 PM »
Acidity can mask some bitterness

I feel like those two clash like the dickens...

Offline pete b

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Re: Help me salvage a brew
« Reply #7 on: May 19, 2016, 11:51:15 AM »
Acidity can mask some bitterness so I guess I understand where the grapefruit juice idea is going. I would try it out in a glass before committing to a full batch. The bitterness you're getting might not hide behind the acidity in the fruit juice. It could make the beer less palatable.
I'm thinking it will ferment in the keg and dry out, so I don't think you will get the same profile as mixing it in a glass.

ale yeast and serving temps should be ok to add juice if it works..shouldn't/likely wouldn't ferment anymore.
I guess I was assuming it goes in the keg when racking from fermenter but I suppose if you open the keg up and add later or cold crash just before... But still, of all juices to reduce bitterness grapefruit seems weird. I would just see if the bitterness fades. I'm not completely sold no fermentation would happen. It's certainly not ideal conditions to pitch in but to me that means it will just be sluggish. I would definitely add juice after its in the keg a couple days, rather than right after racking when there is suspended yeast. Life wants to live...
Don't let the bastards cheer you up.

Offline marshall1

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Re: Help me salvage a brew
« Reply #8 on: May 19, 2016, 01:37:40 PM »
I had a guy say its probably tannins from the fruit and time will help but said that gelatin should drop most of it out.

Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: Help me salvage a brew
« Reply #9 on: May 19, 2016, 01:38:45 PM »
Acidity can mask some bitterness

I feel like those two clash like the dickens...

If we were talking about bitterness from alpha acids I agree completely. Here I think the bitterness he is experiencing is a tannin problem from the watermelon. The acidity in the fruit may help mask some of that.
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Offline pete b

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Re: Help me salvage a brew
« Reply #10 on: May 19, 2016, 02:33:09 PM »
I had a guy say its probably tannins from the fruit and time will help but said that gelatin should drop most of it out.
I suspect that is the answer your looking for. It would be great if you report back whatever you do, its great to have data points. Good luck!
Don't let the bastards cheer you up.

Offline brewinhard

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Re: Help me salvage a brew
« Reply #11 on: May 19, 2016, 04:00:19 PM »
Acidity can mask some bitterness

I feel like those two clash like the dickens...

If we were talking about bitterness from alpha acids I agree completely. Here I think the bitterness he is experiencing is a tannin problem from the watermelon. The acidity in the fruit may help mask some of that.

Gotcha!

Offline Wort-H.O.G.

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Re: Help me salvage a brew
« Reply #12 on: May 19, 2016, 10:51:49 PM »
Acidity can mask some bitterness so I guess I understand where the grapefruit juice idea is going. I would try it out in a glass before committing to a full batch. The bitterness you're getting might not hide behind the acidity in the fruit juice. It could make the beer less palatable.
I'm thinking it will ferment in the keg and dry out, so I don't think you will get the same profile as mixing it in a glass.

ale yeast and serving temps should be ok to add juice if it works..shouldn't/likely wouldn't ferment anymore.
I guess I was assuming it goes in the keg when racking from fermenter but I suppose if you open the keg up and add later or cold crash just before... But still, of all juices to reduce bitterness grapefruit seems weird. I would just see if the bitterness fades. I'm not completely sold no fermentation would happen. It's certainly not ideal conditions to pitch in but to me that means it will just be sluggish. I would definitely add juice after its in the keg a couple days, rather than right after racking when there is suspended yeast. Life wants to live...
Yeah Pete I can't imagine any circumstance with some fining and cold that the ale yeast would resume fermentation of the grapefruit. Agreed that grapefruit may not be the silver bullet though.
Ken- Chagrin Falls, OH
CPT, U.S.Army
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Harveys-Brewhaus/405092862905115

http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?title=The_Science_of_Mashing

Serving:        In Process:
Vienna IPA          O'Fest
Dort
Mead                 
Cider                         
Ger'merican Blonde
Amber Ale
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Ger Pils
O'Fest

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Help me salvage a brew
« Reply #13 on: May 19, 2016, 11:01:47 PM »
As long as you keep it kegged and cold I wouldn't worry. Definitely wouldn't bottle, though, unless the bottles were kept cold and not shipped. 1056, for example, is thought to have possibly been from an old lager brewery, and has an ability to eat @ pretty cold temps.
Jon H.

Offline euge

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Re: Help me salvage a brew
« Reply #14 on: May 22, 2016, 01:46:30 AM »
I was told by a Chef never to try and rescue something that went awry. "Start over" was his advice.

Let that beer sit longer and mellow is my advice.
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