Author Topic: Ginger  (Read 2474 times)

Offline hopaddicted

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Ginger
« on: August 25, 2010, 09:36:17 AM »
Has anyone had any experience brewing with ginger? I think I have seen it a few times in a spice blend for a beer, but never as the main attraction (or at least a headliner).

Any thoughts, experiences, or suggestions are appreciated.
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Kegged: IPA, Saison, Hoppy Brown Ale

Offline gordonstrong

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Re: Ginger
« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2010, 09:37:25 AM »
It's strong. Go easy. In higher concentrations, it has a spicy heat to it.
Gordon Strong • Beavercreek, Ohio • AHA Member since 1997 • Twitter: GordonStrong

Offline denny

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Re: Ginger
« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2010, 09:46:35 AM »
OK, somebody's gotta say it....

I prefer brewing with Maryann!   ::)
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Re: Ginger
« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2010, 09:58:09 AM »
OK, somebody's gotta say it....

I prefer brewing with Maryann!   ::)

Wasn't that another thread? ;)

Go easy on it, it can be harsh and needs some sweetness to counterbalance it.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Ginger
« Reply #4 on: August 25, 2010, 10:44:24 AM »
Agreed on what has been written before (including Denny's comment).

I love ginger.  I like to get a good ginger burn from my ginger stuff too.  I've tried adding heat with just a lot of ginger - an entire pound in secondary.  It doesn't have that much heat, and the ginger is so powerfully floral it takes some getting used to.

What I've found is that if you want some heat in your ginger beverages (of cookies, or whatever), the best way to do it in my experience is with cayenne pepper.  Use enough to get the heat, but not enough to taste the cayenne.  This is one thing that will definitely depend on personal preferences so maybe start with 1/4 tsp and see how it goes.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline tom

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Re: Ginger
« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2010, 10:45:35 AM »
I was going to make a ginger extract by soaking it in vodka for awhile and then dosing a keg to taste. Anyone try that?
Brew on

Offline majorvices

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Re: Ginger
« Reply #6 on: August 25, 2010, 10:48:17 AM »
Agree with the other comments. Use it sparingly unless you want the heat. If you want the heat use it at the beginning of the boil. If you just want the flavor with little heat use it at the last 5 minutes.
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Offline hopaddicted

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Re: Ginger
« Reply #7 on: August 25, 2010, 02:18:48 PM »
Flavor profile can vary quite a bit can't it? I don't cook with it really, so not very familiar with it at all.

I had a special request for a 'ginger ale', so flavor over heat is definitely preferred.

Anyone ever use sushi ginger (think it is pickled ginger)? Thinking this might allow for a more mild flavor.
Primary: Lambic
Secondary: Oktoberfest, German Pilsner, Double IPA,
In Bottles: Lucknow IPA clone, Rough Rider Brown Ale clone,
John Harvard Imperial Stout clone, Hoppy Amber, Witch's Brew (Habanero and Smoked Corn Small Ale), Porter, Dunkleweizen, Dry Stout, Irish Red Ale, American Maple Wheat Ale, Black Wit, Belgian style Wit, Belgian Golden Strong Ale
Kegged: IPA, Saison, Hoppy Brown Ale

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Ginger
« Reply #8 on: August 25, 2010, 02:29:57 PM »
Trade Route Brewing (formerly Laughing Buddha) in Seattle makes a ginger pale ale that is nice and mild.  I don't know the recipe though.  :)

I'd consider boiling a measured amount of ginger in water, then dosing a not-too-hoppy pale ale with it.  That will give you an idea of the amount you should use for the flavor you (or your friend) want.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline majorvices

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Re: Ginger
« Reply #9 on: August 25, 2010, 02:52:40 PM »
I believe the sushi ginger is pickled, I wouldn't think it would work. I make a ginger beer very regularly that uses about 34 grams of ginger the last 5 min of the boil and the ginger is subtle. I'd double it (to start), put it in late and you should get flavor but little heat.
Keith Y.
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Offline hopaddicted

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Re: Ginger
« Reply #10 on: August 25, 2010, 02:58:54 PM »
Do you use fresh ginger? Grate it or chunks?
Primary: Lambic
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John Harvard Imperial Stout clone, Hoppy Amber, Witch's Brew (Habanero and Smoked Corn Small Ale), Porter, Dunkleweizen, Dry Stout, Irish Red Ale, American Maple Wheat Ale, Black Wit, Belgian style Wit, Belgian Golden Strong Ale
Kegged: IPA, Saison, Hoppy Brown Ale

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Re: Ginger
« Reply #11 on: August 25, 2010, 03:15:54 PM »
fresh, grated
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Offline hopaddicted

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Re: Ginger
« Reply #12 on: August 25, 2010, 04:05:34 PM »
Thanks, think I am going to do a pilsner base, lightly hopped (just for bitterness), with a clean lager yeast. I'll have to formulate this weekend, not sure if I am going to do a small or full size batch. Maybe I'll do full batch and separate into smaller batches in the secondary for an experiment of dry seasoning to try different dosings.

Any experience with adding it to the secondary?
Primary: Lambic
Secondary: Oktoberfest, German Pilsner, Double IPA,
In Bottles: Lucknow IPA clone, Rough Rider Brown Ale clone,
John Harvard Imperial Stout clone, Hoppy Amber, Witch's Brew (Habanero and Smoked Corn Small Ale), Porter, Dunkleweizen, Dry Stout, Irish Red Ale, American Maple Wheat Ale, Black Wit, Belgian style Wit, Belgian Golden Strong Ale
Kegged: IPA, Saison, Hoppy Brown Ale

Offline hopaddicted

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Re: Ginger
« Reply #13 on: August 25, 2010, 04:28:41 PM »
With just a hint of 20L crystal.
Primary: Lambic
Secondary: Oktoberfest, German Pilsner, Double IPA,
In Bottles: Lucknow IPA clone, Rough Rider Brown Ale clone,
John Harvard Imperial Stout clone, Hoppy Amber, Witch's Brew (Habanero and Smoked Corn Small Ale), Porter, Dunkleweizen, Dry Stout, Irish Red Ale, American Maple Wheat Ale, Black Wit, Belgian style Wit, Belgian Golden Strong Ale
Kegged: IPA, Saison, Hoppy Brown Ale

Offline richardt

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Re: Ginger
« Reply #14 on: August 26, 2010, 01:33:28 AM »
Fresh, Candied Ginger:

Fresh ginger root from the produce section.
Peel it with a spoon or grater.
Slice med-thin (resembles kettle-style potato chips)
Cook in water for 20 min or so.
Pour off water (removes a lot of the harshness and moderates the spiciness/heat)
Add sugar.
Add a little water back to help dissolve the sugar
Cook on low heat for 20 min or so.  Stir occasionally to prevent scorching.

Place the candied ginger in a nylon mesh bag.
Place the bag in the boil kettle for the last 15 minutes of the boil for flavor.
Great in a Saison.  Flavor was gentle, subtle.  Peppery heat seemed to come from the yeast, not the ginger.