Author Topic: Malt barley variety question  (Read 477 times)

Offline majorvices

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Malt barley variety question
« on: February 25, 2020, 12:29:36 PM »
This was a question texted to
Me from a friend.

“Do you know much about barley varieties? I’m trying to find Pils malt made from either Hanna or Chevallier barley for a Michelob 1896 recreation. The only Chevallier I see is from Crisp and is too highly kilned. I think my best bet is find barley that was bred from Hanna, but I’m kind of striking out”

He has emailed Ron Patterson but I told him I’d ask the forum


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« Last Edit: February 25, 2020, 03:20:45 PM by majorvices »

Offline HopDen

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Re: Malt barley variety question
« Reply #1 on: February 25, 2020, 12:44:31 PM »
Agriculture department in his home state should be able too point him in the right direction.

Offline majorvices

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Re: Malt barley variety question
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2020, 12:51:13 PM »
Agriculture department in his home state should be able too point him in the right direction.

I'll mention that to him but I doubt it since he is in Az

Offline oginme

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Re: Malt barley variety question
« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2020, 01:11:34 PM »
Both the universities of Oregon and Montana both have active breeding programs for barley.  You will most likely get a good answer from those sources as to where you might find specific barley varieties if they are still being grown and malted commercially.

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Malt barley variety question
« Reply #4 on: February 25, 2020, 02:50:57 PM »
He talked about this on another forum.

He should research what varieties have Hanna as an ancestor. IIRC there are some with similar names such as Hannka, or something like that.

Chevalier is grown on limited acreage, as the yield is low.
He should see if Crisp would make some low color malt out of it.

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Re: Malt barley variety question
« Reply #5 on: February 25, 2020, 03:03:11 PM »
Both the universities of Oregon and Montana both have active breeding programs for barley.  You will most likely get a good answer from those sources as to where you might find specific barley varieties if they are still being grown and malted commercially.

Oregon State, not U of O.  I think someone around here might use Chevalier.  I'll see what I can find out.  You might also try contacting the Craft Maltsters Guild.  Craftmalting.com
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Offline oginme

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Re: Malt barley variety question
« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2020, 03:42:35 PM »
Both the universities of Oregon and Montana both have active breeding programs for barley.  You will most likely get a good answer from those sources as to where you might find specific barley varieties if they are still being grown and malted commercially.

Oregon State, not U of O.  I think someone around here might use Chevalier.  I'll see what I can find out.  You might also try contacting the Craft Maltsters Guild.  Craftmalting.com

Thanks for the correction!

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Malt barley variety question
« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2020, 03:55:16 PM »
He might contact John Mallett.
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Offline Northern_Brewer

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Re: Malt barley variety question
« Reply #8 on: February 25, 2020, 05:36:23 PM »
In the UK, Crisp has been taking the lead on resurrecting old barley varieties - there's now a reasonable amount of Chevallier being produced, and last year they produced 14t of Hana which has made some delicious commercial beers so I suspect they'll be doing more of it. I'm not sure how much made it into the homebrew supply chain, other than the tonne that went to the Malt Miller (no affiliation).

But it may be worth asking any retailers who deal with Crisp Stateside whether they can get their hands on any.

Offline EnkAMania

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Re: Malt barley variety question
« Reply #9 on: February 25, 2020, 05:41:12 PM »
Both the universities of Oregon and Montana both have active breeding programs for barley.  You will most likely get a good answer from those sources as to where you might find specific barley varieties if they are still being grown and malted commercially.

Oregon State, not U of O.  I think someone around here might use Chevalier.  I'll see what I can find out.  You might also try contacting the Craft Maltsters Guild.  Craftmalting.com

I think it's Montana State as well.  http://www.montana.edu/barleybreeding/2019-barley-variety-release.html

Thanks for the correction!
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Offline Steve Ruch

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Re: Malt barley variety question
« Reply #10 on: February 25, 2020, 06:35:34 PM »
In the UK, Crisp has been taking the lead on resurrecting old barley varieties - there's now a reasonable amount of Chevallier being produced, and last year they produced 14t of Hana which has made some delicious commercial beers so I suspect they'll be doing more of it. I'm not sure how much made it into the homebrew supply chain, other than the tonne that went to the Malt Miller (no affiliation).

But it may be worth asking any retailers who deal with Crisp Stateside whether they can get their hands on any.
Hop Craft supply has it at $1.79 a pound.
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Offline majorvices

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Re: Malt barley variety question
« Reply #11 on: February 26, 2020, 12:40:46 AM »
In the UK, Crisp has been taking the lead on resurrecting old barley varieties - there's now a reasonable amount of Chevallier being produced, and last year they produced 14t of Hana which has made some delicious commercial beers so I suspect they'll be doing more of it. I'm not sure how much made it into the homebrew supply chain, other than the tonne that went to the Malt Miller (no affiliation).

But it may be worth asking any retailers who deal with Crisp Stateside whether they can get their hands on any.

Thanks! He's a commercial brewer so he may be able to get some

Offline Robert

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Re: Malt barley variety question
« Reply #12 on: February 26, 2020, 04:02:43 AM »
In the UK, Crisp has been taking the lead on resurrecting old barley varieties - there's now a reasonable amount of Chevallier being produced, and last year they produced 14t of Hana which has made some delicious commercial beers so I suspect they'll be doing more of it. I'm not sure how much made it into the homebrew supply chain, other than the tonne that went to the Malt Miller (no affiliation).

But it may be worth asking any retailers who deal with Crisp Stateside whether they can get their hands on any.
Hop Craft supply has it at $1.79 a pound.

Thanks, Steve!  I didn't know anyone had the Crisp Chevallier by the pound, I've only ordered it by the sack through LHBS.  I don't often make ales (not often enough to really justify a whole sack,)  but when I do make a bitter or mild, that's the malt I prefer.   This is great to know.
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Offline Kevin

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Re: Malt barley variety question
« Reply #13 on: February 26, 2020, 03:28:10 PM »
In the UK, Crisp has been taking the lead on resurrecting old barley varieties - there's now a reasonable amount of Chevallier being produced, and last year they produced 14t of Hana which has made some delicious commercial beers so I suspect they'll be doing more of it. I'm not sure how much made it into the homebrew supply chain, other than the tonne that went to the Malt Miller (no affiliation).

But it may be worth asking any retailers who deal with Crisp Stateside whether they can get their hands on any.
Hop Craft supply has it at $1.79 a pound.

Thanks, Steve!  I didn't know anyone had the Crisp Chevallier by the pound, I've only ordered it by the sack through LHBS.  I don't often make ales (not often enough to really justify a whole sack,)  but when I do make a bitter or mild, that's the malt I prefer.   This is great to know.

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Offline brian_welch

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Re: Malt barley variety question
« Reply #14 on: February 26, 2020, 03:29:19 PM »
He talked about this on another forum.

He should research what varieties have Hanna as an ancestor. IIRC there are some with similar names such as Hannka, or something like that.


From the Weyermann website:

Weyermann® Bohemian Pilsner Malt, for example, is produced only from the Hanka barley variety, while the Weyermann® floor-malted Bohemian Pilsner Malt is produced only from Bojos or Tolar. These three varieties have great authenticity value because they are genetic descendants of the mid-19th-century Czech variety Haná, which also known as "Old-Haná Agro-Ecotype.” Haná was the barley in the first Pilsner mash, in 1842, and it has since become the foundation land race for hundreds of top-quality brewing barley varieties cultivated throughout the world today.

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