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Author Topic: Great Hot Side Aereation discussion  (Read 12516 times)

Offline chumley

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Re: Great Hot Side Aereation discussion
« Reply #165 on: January 19, 2024, 05:17:02 pm »
I've skimmed through this low oxygen brewing stuff the last several years, never really thinking about trying it as I am happy with my lagers and it seems to be more trouble to implement than its worth. Now that I have been laid up recovering from knee replacement surgery the past two weeks, I have a question that I haven't seen an answer to.

How does one implement low oxygen brewing techniques when decoction mashing?

Offline BrewBama

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Re: Great Hot Side Aereation discussion
« Reply #166 on: January 19, 2024, 08:09:49 pm »
I've skimmed through this low oxygen brewing stuff the last several years, never really thinking about trying it as I am happy with my lagers and it seems to be more trouble to implement than its worth. Now that I have been laid up recovering from knee replacement surgery the past two weeks, I have a question that I haven't seen an answer to.

How does one implement low oxygen brewing techniques when decoction mashing?
I don’t think you can. Which is interesting because some of the best lagers in the world are said to be decoction mashed.

Online fredthecat

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Re: Great Hot Side Aereation discussion
« Reply #167 on: January 19, 2024, 08:27:20 pm »
i bet simply taking a few litres of extra wort, lets say 4 litres and boiling that down to 1 litre would concentrate melanoidins the same if not more effectively than a decoction. less impact on the mash time too since you could just do it while boiling the wort anyway and add it in

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Great Hot Side Aereation discussion
« Reply #168 on: January 20, 2024, 01:01:01 pm »
I've skimmed through this low oxygen brewing stuff the last several years, never really thinking about trying it as I am happy with my lagers and it seems to be more trouble to implement than its worth. Now that I have been laid up recovering from knee replacement surgery the past two weeks, I have a question that I haven't seen an answer to.

How does one implement low oxygen brewing techniques when decoction mashing?
I don’t think you can. Which is interesting because some of the best lagers in the world are said to be decoction mashed.

Those lagers pump between vessels from the bottom to the bottom.

There are some that have been doing Kesselmaischs. Drain the liquid, boil the mash, add the liquid back from the bottom. Cover liquid with a cap when boiling the mash. Much less exposure than doing a manual transfer with a measuring cup or pitcher.
Jeff Rankert
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Offline BrewBama

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Great Hot Side Aereation discussion
« Reply #169 on: January 20, 2024, 03:07:12 pm »
I've skimmed through this low oxygen brewing stuff the last several years, never really thinking about trying it as I am happy with my lagers and it seems to be more trouble to implement than its worth. Now that I have been laid up recovering from knee replacement surgery the past two weeks, I have a question that I haven't seen an answer to.

How does one implement low oxygen brewing techniques when decoction mashing?
I don’t think you can. Which is interesting because some of the best lagers in the world are said to be decoction mashed.

Those lagers pump between vessels from the bottom to the bottom.

There are some that have been doing Kesselmaischs. Drain the liquid, boil the mash, add the liquid back from the bottom. Cover liquid with a cap when boiling the mash. Much less exposure than doing a manual transfer with a measuring cup or pitcher.
+1

I was thinking pull thick mash vs wort only.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2024, 03:13:57 pm by BrewBama »

Offline denny

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Re: Great Hot Side Aereation discussion
« Reply #170 on: January 21, 2024, 08:13:47 am »
i bet simply taking a few litres of extra wort, lets say 4 litres and boiling that down to 1 litre would concentrate melanoidins the same if not more effectively than a decoction. less impact on the mash time too since you could just do it while boiling the wort anyway and add it in

Nope, totally different
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Offline chumley

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Re: Great Hot Side Aereation discussion
« Reply #171 on: January 22, 2024, 10:45:47 am »
Thanks, Jeff, for the explanation on how commercial breweries decoction mash. Since I mash in a cooler, I guess that technique is out for me.

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Great Hot Side Aereation discussion
« Reply #172 on: January 23, 2024, 08:52:03 pm »
Thanks, Jeff, for the explanation on how commercial breweries decoction mash. Since I mash in a cooler, I guess that technique is out for me.

Try and be as gentle as you can when transferring. I've done that with OK results for Dunkels.

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Offline Bilsch

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Re: Great Hot Side Aereation discussion
« Reply #173 on: January 27, 2024, 06:17:04 pm »
I've skimmed through this low oxygen brewing stuff the last several years, never really thinking about trying it as I am happy with my lagers and it seems to be more trouble to implement than its worth. Now that I have been laid up recovering from knee replacement surgery the past two weeks, I have a question that I haven't seen an answer to.

How does one implement low oxygen brewing techniques when decoction mashing?

Don't forget to consider the effect of square cube law between the average home brew sized mashtun and large commercial ones. The difference of surface area in contact with air to the amount of liquid is so much less in the big systems.