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Author Topic: Selecting yeast for a recipe?  (Read 1227 times)

Offline Joe_Beer

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Selecting yeast for a recipe?
« on: February 20, 2023, 04:36:11 pm »
Is there any kind of rule-of-thumb for yeast selection when coming up with a recipe? For instance, if you make a typical heffeweizen, the yeast is profoundly front-and-center. You can't NOT notice it. A good many of the IPAs I've had though, the yeast is more like a bass player. You can tell it's there, but with everything else going on, it's hard to notice unless it's not there.

Do you kind of just settle on a yeast you like, or are you constantly experimenting?

Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Selecting yeast for a recipe?
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2023, 05:06:25 pm »
I like to buy whatever is cheapest.  Most yeasts these days are pretty great, so why not save a few bucks.

Usually I use dry yeast because it's foolproof and usually cheaper than liquid strains which are less reliable.

Other than that, I do love to experiment.  One of the big reasons I developed my little yeast tool (https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/16XRUloO3WXqH9Ixsf5vx2DIKDmrEQJ36tLRBmmya7Jo/edit?usp=sharing) was to give me ideas to explore AND so I could more easily substitute other yeasts that might sometimes be cheaper.
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Offline fredthecat

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Re: Selecting yeast for a recipe?
« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2023, 06:26:16 pm »
Is there any kind of rule-of-thumb for yeast selection when coming up with a recipe? For instance, if you make a typical heffeweizen, the yeast is profoundly front-and-center. You can't NOT notice it. A good many of the IPAs I've had though, the yeast is more like a bass player. You can tell it's there, but with everything else going on, it's hard to notice unless it's not there.

Do you kind of just settle on a yeast you like, or are you constantly experimenting?


yes, bry97 is a go-to yeast for me especially for if i want to just make a strong beer without making a first-beer to build up sufficient yeast quantity.

its cheap and has really good brewing qualities (consistent results/attenutation/flocculation is decent etc), better than US-05 imho for a clean simply cali style yeast.

some yeasts i've found to be a pain in the ass or underattenuate (at least based on how i treated them) or just have a taste i really don't like.







Offline denny

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Re: Selecting yeast for a recipe?
« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2023, 08:51:48 am »
I've pretty much settled on BRY97 for most American styles, Diamond Lager or S189 for lagers, and Wy3787 or 3522 for Belgian styles.
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Offline erockrph

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Re: Selecting yeast for a recipe?
« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2023, 01:31:05 pm »
I keep plenty of dry yeast on hand, so when yeast flavor expression isn't a factor I generally use BRY-97 for clean ales, and 34/70 for lagers (although I might change to Diamond if it continues to perform as well as it did in my last lager).
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Online tommymorris

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Re: Selecting yeast for a recipe?
« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2023, 01:55:26 pm »
I have done 4-5 batches with Verdant IPA dry yeast. I have used it in an ordinary bitter, blonde ale, American Pale Ale, American Amber, and American IPA. I have really liked all the beers I have made with it. It attenuates well so you get a dry crisp finish and the fruit flavors are good but not too strong. I feel it is a great substitute for
Bry-97 if you want to try something different. It is definitely not a 1-to-1 replacement. It is more fruity, but I like that.

Offline Joe_Beer

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Re: Selecting yeast for a recipe?
« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2023, 04:09:14 pm »
I have an IPA recipe that I usually make with WLP002. I tried A07, BRY-97 and Verdant IPA in a few batches and but ended up back at WLP002. I was hoping for something awesome because I've heard a lot of good things about Verdant especially. Maybe I should try again and mash a little hotter. The BRY-97 batch mashed at 149F.  I like my IPAs a little hazier and malty.
« Last Edit: February 21, 2023, 04:11:36 pm by Joe_Beer »

Online tommymorris

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Re: Selecting yeast for a recipe?
« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2023, 08:08:13 pm »
I have an IPA recipe that I usually make with WLP002. I tried A07, BRY-97 and Verdant IPA in a few batches and but ended up back at WLP002. I was hoping for something awesome because I've heard a lot of good things about Verdant especially. Maybe I should try again and mash a little hotter. The BRY-97 batch mashed at 149F.  I like my IPAs a little hazier and malty.
Verdant dries the beer out a lot more than WLP002. I don’t mean to say it will replace WLP002. I love WLP002. But, I don’t use many liquid yeasts since they aren’t available locally for me.

Offline fredthecat

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Re: Selecting yeast for a recipe?
« Reply #8 on: February 21, 2023, 08:17:45 pm »
i know it may seem like a re-tread, but its years and years on now. any of you well experienced guys have any other favourite yeasts?

i know some of the ones regulars here say they use frequently already.

Offline Joe_Beer

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Re: Selecting yeast for a recipe?
« Reply #9 on: February 22, 2023, 02:57:50 am »
After looking over dmtaylors spreadsheet (Thanks for putting that together!), I was wondering what "estery" actually means. I ran across what seems like a concise and simple explanation here for anyone interested.

The link (if accurate) states American-style beers tend to express minimal yeast character, instead highlighting the flavors and aromas associated malt and hops. and that English ale yeasts tend to express more estery character than their American cousins.

I may want to look into other English ale yeasts since I seem to prefer WLP002. Just not sure how to pick one. Dave's spreadsheet is cool because he's got some notes regarding the various types of yeasts and even though subjective, it's still better than just throwing a dart. The attenuation notes are handy as well.


Online tommymorris

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Re: Selecting yeast for a recipe?
« Reply #10 on: February 22, 2023, 06:01:27 am »
After looking over dmtaylors spreadsheet (Thanks for putting that together!), I was wondering what "estery" actually means. I ran across what seems like a concise and simple explanation here for anyone interested.

The link (if accurate) states American-style beers tend to express minimal yeast character, instead highlighting the flavors and aromas associated malt and hops. and that English ale yeasts tend to express more estery character than their American cousins.

I may want to look into other English ale yeasts since I seem to prefer WLP002. Just not sure how to pick one. Dave's spreadsheet is cool because he's got some notes regarding the various types of yeasts and even though subjective, it's still better than just throwing a dart. The attenuation notes are handy as well.
If you’re looking for English dry yeasts I recommend trying some of these. They are all English despite the names in some cases. None of them are a WLP002 replacement.

I like these in no particular order.
Lalbrew Verdant IPA
Lalbrew New England
Fermentis S-04
Mangrove Jack’s Liberty Bell M36

These are good too, but low attenuators.
Lalbrew London
Lalbrew Windsor

Offline BrewBama

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Selecting yeast for a recipe?
« Reply #11 on: February 22, 2023, 06:27:42 am »
…I was wondering what "estery" actually means. …

Think of esters as reminiscent of fruit flavors. Apple, banana, peach, pear, pineapple, etc.

English beers are often described as having an orange marmalade-like character. This can be aided by yeast. Verdant for example is supposed to be ‘estery’ (apricot, tropical fruit, and citrus).
« Last Edit: February 22, 2023, 06:34:04 am by BrewBama »

Offline redrocker652002

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Re: Selecting yeast for a recipe?
« Reply #12 on: February 22, 2023, 07:21:19 am »
Being fairly new, I have had good luck with S05 and Bry97.  I have used a couple of liquid yeasts, that due to user error, did not work out too well.  I have seen Verdant mentioned a number of times, so maybe I will give that a go with my next IPA.  I am trying to branch out, so Pales, Blondes and the like are going to be in the works.  I seem to have good luck with Bry97 at the moment.

Offline denny

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Re: Selecting yeast for a recipe?
« Reply #13 on: February 22, 2023, 08:34:06 am »
i know it may seem like a re-tread, but its years and years on now. any of you well experienced guys have any other favourite yeasts?

i know some of the ones regulars here say they use frequently already.

WY1450, believe it or not
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Offline Joe_Beer

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Re: Selecting yeast for a recipe?
« Reply #14 on: February 22, 2023, 02:50:41 pm »

WY1450, believe it or not

Haha..  ;)
I do like that yeast. Wry Smile is soooo good.
Maybe I should try that in my hoppy west coast IPA and see how it goes. Might be just what I'm looking for.