Author Topic: Historic Kentucky Common  (Read 3871 times)

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Historic Kentucky Common
« Reply #15 on: April 20, 2017, 10:25:59 PM »
I feel that it's a stigma, much like diacetyl. It's OK if someone doesn't like corn flavor, but I really wish more brewers would experiment with corn.

The issue with corn, much like diacetyl, is the average craft beer snob snubs it because that's what they've been trained to do.

4 out of 4 beers I have on tap right now have corn ranging from 9-33%.  The stigma is lost on me :D
I like corn in beer, corn on the cob, corn in mac&cheese, corn in taco meat, creamed corn, corny jokes.... well, you get the idea  ;D


Yeah, corn gets a bad rap. I like it in a few beers. Even used it in a IIPA a few times. I think back in the day when the craft beer boom was starting, craft beers were marketed as 'all malt' beers, to differentiate themselves from the high rice % BMC adjunct beers. Except corn can be a nice adjunct IMO.
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Re: Historic Kentucky Common
« Reply #16 on: April 21, 2017, 03:35:00 AM »
It's like a red cream ale.  Personally reminds me of an English bitter as well, with not so much caramel though.

FWIW, many British brewers used corn in their beers back before WWI. It's only after that point that invert sugar became the primary adjunct.

Take that, corn adjuncts =/= craft believers. I wish corn would lose the stigma, it's fantastic if used properly.
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Offline riceral

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Re: Historic Kentucky Common
« Reply #17 on: April 21, 2017, 06:28:55 PM »

Yeast - undecided.
Of the standard ale strains I have on hand to build up are:
001/051/080/US05/1098/1450

I'm thinking of a Ky Common and using WLP810 SF Lager yeast.

Any thoughts?

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Offline goschman

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Re: Historic Kentucky Common
« Reply #18 on: April 21, 2017, 06:40:58 PM »

Yeast - undecided.
Of the standard ale strains I have on hand to build up are:
001/051/080/US05/1098/1450

I'm thinking of a Ky Common and using WLP810 SF Lager yeast.

Any thoughts?

I was thinking the same thing!
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Offline JJeffers09

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Re: Historic Kentucky Common
« Reply #19 on: April 21, 2017, 07:23:06 PM »
It's like chili, everyone can do it their own way.

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Offline coolman26

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Re: Historic Kentucky Common
« Reply #20 on: April 22, 2017, 01:11:19 PM »
Apocalypse, Falls City, Akasha, and Against the Grain all make a Ky Common in Louisville. Against the Grain uses a sour mash. I'm guessing that Common wasn't a sour mash. Oertel's 92 was a main beer around Lou. I remember giving my mom a taste of New Castle. She said,"that tastes just like Oertel's 92."  I think Common was like that. Session strength at 4%-4.5%. I think the black malt was added only for ph adjustment, could be wrong. I've researched it and tried all of them. I've not brewed one yet. I think 1450 might add a nice body to a Common. I think, for me, the mouth feel is what is lacking in all of these that I've tried. Possibly 1450 could add what is missing.


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Offline JJeffers09

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Re: Historic Kentucky Common
« Reply #21 on: April 22, 2017, 02:22:55 PM »
Apocalypse, Falls City, Akasha, and Against the Grain all make a Ky Common in Louisville. Against the Grain uses a sour mash. I'm guessing that Common wasn't a sour mash. Oertel's 92 was a main beer around Lou. I remember giving my mom a taste of New Castle. She said,"that tastes just like Oertel's 92."  I think Common was like that. Session strength at 4%-4.5%. I think the black malt was added only for ph adjustment, could be wrong. I've researched it and tried all of them. I've not brewed one yet. I think 1450 might add a nice body to a Common. I think, for me, the mouth feel is what is lacking in all of these that I've tried. Possibly 1450 could add what is missing.


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From my understanding most barrels back then went sour from slow turn around and a wide variety of barrels used, but were not intended to be sour.  Sour mashing IIRC in a Kentucky common, and have read to be a myth.  I am not that well versed in sours or sour mashing, but I would fear the low pH would become problematic with the heavy pitch and the quick turn around on this brew.  I don't know how the beer would benefit from a sour mash from a flavor aspect, because again that is something I am still getting my feet wet with.  So take this reply as just brew talk, well French pressed brew talk... 

Would it turn out like an oud bruin at that point?  Would the high amount of corn lead to an even thinner product with the sour mash breaking down a dextrinous into fermentable sugars?
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Offline coolman26

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Historic Kentucky Common
« Reply #22 on: April 22, 2017, 04:27:59 PM »
The Against the Grain one with the sour mash, was unique. I'm not huge on sour beers. I don't mind them, but it didn't really fancy me in the Common. I'm sure the true Common beers were thin. Probably so they were easy drinking with the use of ale yeast.


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Offline chinaski

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Re: Historic Kentucky Common
« Reply #23 on: April 22, 2017, 07:12:20 PM »
Stan Hieronymous' Brewing Local book has a fairly meaty section on KY Common.  A good book to pick up.

Offline Mardoo

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Re: Historic Kentucky Common
« Reply #24 on: April 23, 2017, 05:43:39 AM »
I've been planning to use the White Labs bourbon yeast, which is said to add a touch of caramel.

Offline JJeffers09

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Re: Historic Kentucky Common
« Reply #25 on: April 24, 2017, 12:15:49 AM »
I've been planning to use the White Labs bourbon yeast, which is said to add a touch of caramel.
Interesting.  I would imagine the caramel flavors described come with higher alcohols, but if it could create that faux caramel flavor at session strength that would be a very interesting malty ale strain.

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Offline Mardoo

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Re: Historic Kentucky Common
« Reply #26 on: April 24, 2017, 12:30:13 AM »
I've been planning to use the White Labs bourbon yeast, which is said to add a touch of caramel.
Interesting.  I would imagine the caramel flavors described come with higher alcohols, but if it could create that faux caramel flavor at session strength that would be a very interesting malty ale strain.

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Yeah, I haven't had a chance to try it yet. It occurred to me that perhaps brewers at the time just used the easily available local yeast. Adding guess to supposition, I thought that may have been yeast used on the sour mash to produce the wash for the bourbon. NFI whether it will work, but I look forward to the experiment.

Offline senseichaz

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Re: Historic Kentucky Common
« Reply #27 on: April 29, 2017, 12:51:55 PM »
I have brewed around ten batches of KC. It's a great beer to brew for quick turn around. Brew Sunday, ferment all week, keg, carb and serve on Sunday. It does mellow nicely with age but when your buddy says, "How about you brew a beer for the wedding next week?" You can actually do it.

Also makes a great style to experiment with. I've added cherry extract with success. I brew mine a bit higher gravity, with an ABV around 7-7.5. Has always been a crowd pleaser.


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Offline JJeffers09

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Re: Historic Kentucky Common
« Reply #28 on: April 30, 2017, 09:40:31 PM »
I've been planning to use the White Labs bourbon yeast, which is said to add a touch of caramel.
Interesting.  I would imagine the caramel flavors described come with higher alcohols, but if it could create that faux caramel flavor at session strength that would be a very interesting malty ale strain.

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Yeah, I haven't had a chance to try it yet. It occurred to me that perhaps brewers at the time just used the easily available local yeast. Adding guess to supposition, I thought that may have been yeast used on the sour mash to produce the wash for the bourbon. NFI whether it will work, but I look forward to the experiment.
Report back when you do! I like to hear the results.

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Offline JJeffers09

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Re: Historic Kentucky Common
« Reply #29 on: May 04, 2017, 01:21:04 PM »
First run of recipe

1.050 OG
29.2IBUs
14.8SRM
4.8% ABV

60.2% 6-row
36.1% Flaked Corn
2.4% Carafa III
1.2% Crystal 30L

Hops
24.4IBUs Northern Brewer - 60m
4.8IBUs Perle - 10m

Okay, now I am considering the water profile...
Amber Balanced
70ppm Calcium
7ppm Magnesium
38ppm Sodium
90ppm Sulfate
81ppm Chloride
-93 Bicarbonate
1.10 SO4/Cl

Lactic Acid to drop to 5.2 is ~0.2707mL/L mash water
That works up to about 12.3mL and that is a lot more than I am used to.

Yeast - undecided.
Of the standard ale strains I have on hand to build up are:
001/051/080/US05/1098/1450
I'm thinking about modifying my hops and schedule.  I'm thinking

20 IBUs at 75m northern brewer 6.9%
8-10IBUs at 20m NB 6.9%
1oz Crystal at flame out

I was thinking an herbal/floral/mint thing going on.  LHBS owner suggested Crystal and I think it sounds good.  What's your take on it?

Because I am unfamiliar with both...

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« Last Edit: May 04, 2017, 01:23:34 PM by JJeffers09 »
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