Author Topic: Imperial Rustic  (Read 9023 times)

Offline stpug

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Re: Imperial Rustic
« Reply #30 on: September 07, 2017, 05:51:39 pm »
I know a lot can change from hydro sample to conditioned beer, but based on my last couple hydro samples I'm hoping that the Bluagies isn't a little one dimensional.

I realize that fermentation temps and schedule, yeast health, etc. all play into what you can squeeze out of a yeast in terms of getting a full spectrum, i.e. earthiness, spice, fruit, esters and phenols, of course specific characteristics of the yeast(s) used.

But would any of you characterize the Blaugies fermented at high temp as a bit one dimensional - as in juicy fruity?

I'm hoping the yeast profile flavors will become more complex than what I'm tasting now.

Well, "juicy fruit gum" is definitely a ester character I get from 3726 but it is generally coupled with the lesser-present phenolics (spicy, peppery; not clove) and an "earthiness", in addition to the added tartness the yeast creates.  I would not call it one dimensional but, to me, it's more fruit-centric, as opposed to the french saison strain that's more spicy/peppery (to me at least).

I wonder if you current findings are a result of the 3724 bulk fermentation followed by the Rustic finishing fermentation?  It will be interesting to see what you think as it finishes up and conditions.  I'll keep my fingers crossed for you that it's game picks up a bit downstream.

Offline brewsumore

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Re: Imperial Rustic
« Reply #31 on: September 07, 2017, 06:02:42 pm »
Thanks stpug - right to the gist of my question -- and I hope i'm not hijacking here.  I'm getting a bit tired of 3711 and looking to get more into "classic" saison, although as others have said 3711 works very well with some fruit or spice background saisons - and is great in one of Major's beers I have brewed at least a couple times -his lime leaf ginger saison.

No doubt this beer will have plenty going on - will check in later.  I'm actually pretty excited and happy.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Imperial Rustic
« Reply #32 on: September 07, 2017, 06:45:43 pm »
Similarly, I get fruity esters from this strain more than other saison strains, but never fruity ester alone. There's always an earthiness at the various temp schedules I've used, and a subtle pepper.
Jon H.

Offline zwiller

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Re: Imperial Rustic
« Reply #33 on: September 08, 2017, 07:44:15 am »
Similar here and far from one dimensional.  I get fruit, pepper, and this woodsy, cassia type thing that I could see some call earthy.  I would call 3711 one dimensional tho.  Quick, dry, but blah.  I can see it working with a spice or fruit version. 

I tend to think the magic is formed early on so maybe you missed out?  You owe it to yourself to try solo Blaugies before ruling it out. 
Sam
Sandusky, OH

Offline brewsumore

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Re: Imperial Rustic
« Reply #34 on: September 08, 2017, 04:19:19 pm »
Similar here and far from one dimensional.  I get fruit, pepper, and this woodsy, cassia type thing that I could see some call earthy.  I would call 3711 one dimensional tho.  Quick, dry, but blah.  I can see it working with a spice or fruit version. 

I tend to think the magic is formed early on so maybe you missed out?  You owe it to yourself to try solo Blaugies before ruling it out.

I was looking at some old brew notes (Nov 2011) for a Kaffir (lime leaf and ginger) Saison, which is the only time I brewed solo 3726 or ever even used it before, and at that time fermented one bucket with the 3726 (77F pitch eventually up into low 80's), and the other bucket with 3711.  I kegged the 3711 batch and bottled the Blaugies batch - both of which attenuated well. 

I recall that what has been stated here is true, namely that the 3726 was flavorful and enjoyable more so young, and had a smoother fruitier profile than the 3711 (no surprise there), but that after probably a year in the bottle, it became uninteresting.  My notes said that at kegging the 3726 had a smooth, lemony, vinous flavor if that sounds at all familiar at lower ferment temp.

Anyway, I'll drink this current batch more quickly, and straight from the kegerator after maybe 2 weeks conditioning. 
« Last Edit: September 08, 2017, 04:21:52 pm by brewsumore »

Offline brewsumore

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Re: Imperial Rustic
« Reply #35 on: September 10, 2017, 04:01:13 pm »
I went back to Markowski's "Farmhouse Ales" seeking recipe inspiration for a re-pitch batch, and saw that he reports that Blaugies, for their Saison d'Epeautre (OG 1.048) primary ferments at 77 - 80F, and that their storage period is only five days at 41F.  I'm not sure if that "storage" immediately follows primary fermentation, but that's the way I read it.  Interesting tidbit.

Offline zwiller

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Re: Imperial Rustic
« Reply #36 on: September 14, 2017, 01:38:56 pm »
https://farmhousebeerblog.wordpress.com/2015/07/12/yeast-brasserie-de-blaugies/

4 weeks and that makes sense for bottle conditioning.  Back when I bottled I rarely had full carb in 2 weeks.  I would imagine if they thought extended aging was necessary that would be at least a few months. 
Sam
Sandusky, OH

Offline brewsumore

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Re: Imperial Rustic
« Reply #37 on: September 14, 2017, 04:33:27 pm »
https://farmhousebeerblog.wordpress.com/2015/07/12/yeast-brasserie-de-blaugies/

4 weeks and that makes sense for bottle conditioning.  Back when I bottled I rarely had full carb in 2 weeks.  I would imagine if they thought extended aging was necessary that would be at least a few months.

Cool!  I'll pull my mostly carbed kegs from the kegerator and put them in the wine cellar for at least a couple weeks.  At kegging (1.005) it was amazingly clean and tasty, and much more balanced fruity (vs. fruit bomb) and did have underlying slight earthy and peppery elements - and thankfully I noticed a tad of bubble gum that snuck in with the 3724, that I hope will stick around.  Life is grand.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Imperial Rustic
« Reply #38 on: September 14, 2017, 04:50:24 pm »
https://farmhousebeerblog.wordpress.com/2015/07/12/yeast-brasserie-de-blaugies/

4 weeks and that makes sense for bottle conditioning.  Back when I bottled I rarely had full carb in 2 weeks.  I would imagine if they thought extended aging was necessary that would be at least a few months.

Cool!  I'll pull my mostly carbed kegs from the kegerator and put them in the wine cellar for at least a couple weeks.  At kegging (1.005) it was amazingly clean and tasty, and much more balanced fruity (vs. fruit bomb) and did have underlying slight earthy and peppery elements - and thankfully I noticed a tad of bubble gum that snuck in with the 3724, that I hope will stick around.  Life is grand.


Sounds good!
Jon H.