Author Topic: What's next after "Brewing Classic Styles"?  (Read 1699 times)

Offline ericw

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What's next after "Brewing Classic Styles"?
« on: November 28, 2018, 06:40:18 PM »
I own "Brewing Classic Styles" and have had great success brewing beers from that book and adapting recipes from ones in that book. Is there a suggested "next" book that would be a good follow-up with more good recipes, etc?

Thanks!

Offline denny

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Re: What's next after "Brewing Classic Styles"?
« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2018, 07:01:59 PM »
How about Experimental Homebrewing for something a bit different?
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Offline riceral

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Re: What's next after "Brewing Classic Styles"?
« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2018, 08:15:40 PM »
Maybe Radial Brewing by Randy Mosher
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Offline Robert

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Re: What's next after "Brewing Classic Styles"?
« Reply #3 on: November 28, 2018, 08:34:09 PM »
Good suggestions,  and if you're interested in historical beers (up to ~1960, just a few years after Denny became an established authority on brewing ;) ) Ron Pattinson's The Home Brewer's Guide to Vintage Beer and Let's Brew! are great resources, recipes compiled from his blog.
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Offline denny

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Re: What's next after "Brewing Classic Styles"?
« Reply #4 on: November 28, 2018, 09:19:56 PM »
Good suggestions,  and if you're interested in historical beers (up to ~1960, just a few years after Denny became an established authority on brewing ;) ) Ron Pattinson's The Home Brewer's Guide to Vintage Beer and Let's Brew! are great resources, recipes compiled from his blog.

 ;D
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline kramerog

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Re: What's next after "Brewing Classic Styles"?
« Reply #5 on: November 29, 2018, 03:46:46 AM »
Gordon Strong's book would be next in that it is written by a winner of Homebrewer of the Year back when people medaled in multiple catergories in the NHC.  There is just one caveat.  He has his own particular brewing philosophy which if you brew exclusively with RO water will work like a charm, but if you find part of the challenge/enjoyment of brewing is messing with water chemistry than you might not like it as much.  I'm in the latter category so I haven't read the book, but I can't argue with his results.

Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: What's next after "Brewing Classic Styles"?
« Reply #6 on: November 29, 2018, 11:41:35 AM »
Agreed that both of Gordon’s books are well worth reading:

https://www.brewerspublications.com/blogs/author/gordon-strong

For historical perspectives, there are several BA books by Horst Dornbusch and the like that give nice treatment of beer styles with historical background into the style.

Cheers!
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Offline duncan

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Re: What's next after "Brewing Classic Styles"?
« Reply #7 on: November 29, 2018, 03:42:05 PM »
Looks like the two I would recommend have been mentioned...

"Modern Homebrew Recipes" by Gordon Strong in many ways feels like Brewing Classic Styles. "Experimental Brewing" by Randy Mosher is one of my personal favorites because it has a good mix of history and recipes.

Can't go wrong with either!
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Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: What's next after "Brewing Classic Styles"?
« Reply #8 on: November 29, 2018, 04:35:28 PM »
Not a book but the clone recipes on the AHA site and Craft Beer & Brewing's website include a lot of great recipes you can play with that are modern renditions of the style.
Heck yeah I blog about homebrewing: Brain Sparging on Brewing

Offline denny

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Re: What's next after "Brewing Classic Styles"?
« Reply #9 on: November 29, 2018, 04:41:17 PM »
Looks like the two I would recommend have been mentioned...

"Modern Homebrew Recipes" by Gordon Strong in many ways feels like Brewing Classic Styles. "Experimental Brewing" by Randy Mosher is one of my personal favorites because it has a good mix of history and recipes.

Can't go wrong with either!

Um, that's Experimental Homebrewing by Drew and me.  Randy's book is Radical Brewing.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline Iliff Ave Brewhouse

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Re: What's next after "Brewing Classic Styles"?
« Reply #10 on: November 29, 2018, 06:41:05 PM »
Another plug for Mosher's Radical Brewing
On Tap/Bottled: Golsch, Iliff IPA, Hopfenbier, Salted berry cider

Fermenting: Rye Cream Ale
Up Next: G Pils, Maibock

Offline Kevin

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Re: What's next after "Brewing Classic Styles"?
« Reply #11 on: November 29, 2018, 07:26:44 PM »
Before you leap into Radical Brewing by Randy Mosher check out his book called Mastering Homebrew.

And yes, for real historical brewing background and recipes, Ron Pattinson's blog and books.
“He was a wise man who invented beer.”
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Offline denny

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Re: What's next after "Brewing Classic Styles"?
« Reply #12 on: November 29, 2018, 08:15:44 PM »
Before you leap into Radical Brewing by Randy Mosher check out his book called Mastering Homebrew.

Excellent suggestion.  An underappreciated book.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline BrewnWKopperKat

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Re: What's next after "Brewing Classic Styles"?
« Reply #13 on: November 29, 2018, 11:27:46 PM »
Is there a suggested "next" book [to "Brewing Classic Styles"] that would be a good follow-up with more good recipes, etc?

Take a look at "Secrets of the Master Brewers" by Jeff Alworth. 

Quote from: the how to use section of the book
So, what you’ll find in the book is a country-by-country collection of chapters. Each section begins with a discussion of the country at hand and what makes its national tradition distinctive. It may not seem immediately evident how Berliner weisse and helles lagers are alike, but they have more in common than you might imagine. Beyond that, the basic techniques shared among the traditions, things like open fermentation, barrel aging, kettle souring, spicing, decoction mashing, lagering, are described in detail only once. If one of these practices is relevant to a particular style but detailed elsewhere, I’ve mentioned where you can learn more.

The previously mentioned books (and authors) are good choices as well - I. have each of these books in my "ebook-shelf".

Offline davidw

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Re: What's next after "Brewing Classic Styles"?
« Reply #14 on: November 30, 2018, 01:18:56 PM »
I own "Brewing Classic Styles" and have had great success brewing beers from that book and adapting recipes from ones in that book. Is there a suggested "next" book that would be a good follow-up with more good recipes, etc?

Thanks!

Surprised no one has mentioned Ray Daniels. If you want the best follow up to BCS then Designing Great Beers is what you are looking for. Ray's credentials are unmatched:

https://www.brewerspublications.com/products/designing-great-beers-the-ultimate-guide-to-brewing-classic-beer-styles

"The intriguing situation about brewing, on the other hand, is that mechanisms are theoretically possible, and the real key to success is the ability to identify those that are genuinely relevant in any particular situation."

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