Author Topic: s04 and other fast strains  (Read 754 times)

Offline MattyAHA

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s04 and other fast strains
« on: February 14, 2019, 04:39:29 PM »
this is the first time in a long time i used s04 and its kinda surprising how fast this yeast ferments, i pitched a pack rehydrated 2 days ago and its done already, of coarse im gonna let it condition before packaging it but damn that was fast, granted the OG was 1.052, this is to be expected with this strain from what i gather, what are some other fast strains you recommend?
Matty


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Offline Todd H.

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Re: s04 and other fast strains
« Reply #1 on: February 14, 2019, 07:00:23 PM »
In my experience, Nottingham is also pretty fast.  Ringwood (1187) too if you ferment in an open vessel.

Offline Robert

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Re: s04 and other fast strains
« Reply #2 on: February 14, 2019, 07:09:24 PM »
In my experience, Nottingham is also pretty fast.  Ringwood (1187) too if you ferment in an open vessel.
My experience also is that S-04 will usually be done in a couple of days, less than 3, and yeah Nottingham is maybe even faster.  My last batch with Nottingham finished in 48 hours, 12.7°P down to 1.5°P.  And S-04 and Nottingham don't seem to have the oxygen requirement some strains like 1187 have.
Rob Stein
Akron, Ohio

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Offline BrewBama

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Re: s04 and other fast strains
« Reply #3 on: February 14, 2019, 07:43:41 PM »
A side affect of S-04 finishing fast and then dropping like a stone is low attenuation. But if you plan for it the results can be a beautifully clear pint of English goodness.


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Offline brewinhard

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Re: s04 and other fast strains
« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2019, 06:49:07 PM »
My last run with WY 1469 was very rapid. All 3 beers I made were done fermenting in just about 2 days. Ranging in OG from 1.045 up to 1.058.

Offline Robert

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Re: s04 and other fast strains
« Reply #5 on: February 15, 2019, 08:12:07 PM »
My last run with WY 1469 was very rapid. All 3 beers I made were done fermenting in just about 2 days. Ranging in OG from 1.045 up to 1.058.
Does 1469 require extra aeration or open fermentation to do this?  Recall hearing somewhere it might be one of those.
Rob Stein
Akron, Ohio

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Offline Pope of Dope

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Re: s04 and other fast strains
« Reply #6 on: February 19, 2019, 03:19:01 AM »
Just brewed something with WLP004. It went off in the fermenter like a bomb and finished at 1.086 OG beer in 2 days, taking it down to 1.030. The only problem I had was heat, such a vigorous ferment I had trouble controlling the heat despite using a refrigerated ferment chamber. Even though things heated up into the 70's, I don't detect any fruity esters in there and no alcoholic-fire-breath. 
Generally you don't see that kind of behavior in a major appliance.

Offline purduekenn

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Re: s04 and other fast strains
« Reply #7 on: February 22, 2019, 02:10:47 AM »
I brewed a British Ale using Windsor Yeast it started at 1.046 and it was finished fermenting in 3 days at 1.016. My last milk stout using S-04 started at 1.057 and finished at 1.023 in 4 days. Both of these yeast strains finish fast and have low attentuation. Safebrew Abby Ale Yeast BE-256 is also a fast fermenter of Belgian style beers if I remember correctly.

Offline purduekenn

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Re: s04 and other fast strains
« Reply #8 on: February 22, 2019, 02:28:48 AM »
Wyeast 1968 London ESB is fast too. I brewed a British Brown Ale with it that finished in 4 days from 1.048 to 1.015.

Offline Robert

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Re: s04 and other fast strains
« Reply #9 on: February 22, 2019, 02:38:16 AM »
Pretty much any genuine English ale yeast is fast.  Breweries there typically expect 2 days, 3 tops, fermentation, then a few days settling, and it's in the cask and out the door a week after brewing.  They've bred the yeasts to get beer in the pub making money,  not taking up room in the equipment.   If English yeasts ever take longer for us, we're probably not giving them the exact conditions they expect.
Rob Stein
Akron, Ohio

I'd rather have questions I can't answer than answers I can't question.

Offline purduekenn

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Re: s04 and other fast strains
« Reply #10 on: February 24, 2019, 03:41:10 PM »
I brewed a Belgian Golden Ale with Fermentis BE-256 yeast on 2/19/19, OG was 1.074. Today, 2/24/19 its at 1.007.

Offline Robert

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Re: s04 and other fast strains
« Reply #11 on: February 25, 2019, 01:47:33 PM »
FWIW, I've got a batch now with BRY-97.   The interwebs will assure you that this strain has a 24-48 hour lag time and is very slow thereafter.   It was active at 5 hours, and at 42 hours is at 62% AA and still rocking and rolling fast, low to mid 60°s fermentation  temperature throughout.  Exactly like every other ale fermentation I have with other strains.  It's probably not so much the strain as wort composition,  yeast health,  pitch rate and so on that determines fermentation rate.
Rob Stein
Akron, Ohio

I'd rather have questions I can't answer than answers I can't question.

Offline BrewBama

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Re: s04 and other fast strains
« Reply #12 on: February 25, 2019, 08:00:18 PM »
FWIW, I've got a batch now with BRY-97.   The interwebs will assure you that this strain has a 24-48 hour lag time and is very slow thereafter.   It was active at 5 hours, and at 42 hours is at 62% AA and still rocking and rolling fast, low to mid 60°s fermentation  temperature throughout.  Exactly like every other ale fermentation I have with other strains.  It's probably not so much the strain as wort composition,  yeast health,  pitch rate and so on that determines fermentation rate.

That is remarkable. I have waited three daze for Bry-97 to kick off before. Once it gets going I’ve had great results.

How did you pitch the yeast?


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Offline Robert

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Re: s04 and other fast strains
« Reply #13 on: February 25, 2019, 08:09:40 PM »
FWIW, I've got a batch now with BRY-97.   The interwebs will assure you that this strain has a 24-48 hour lag time and is very slow thereafter.   It was active at 5 hours, and at 42 hours is at 62% AA and still rocking and rolling fast, low to mid 60°s fermentation  temperature throughout.  Exactly like every other ale fermentation I have with other strains.  It's probably not so much the strain as wort composition,  yeast health,  pitch rate and so on that determines fermentation rate.

That is remarkable. I have waited three daze for Bry-97 to kick off before. Once it gets going I’ve had great results.

How did you pitch the yeast?


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Propped it up.  Seems to alleviate most of the problems I've encountered with most dry yeasts in the first generation. (Though Notty propped up still sucks in the first generation IMO,  so I think I'm done with it.  But that's another topic.)  Removes the potential convenience, but I'm looking at dry yeast simply as another way to get a new culture,  and since there  is apparently no liquid culture of BRY-97 available at present, I got the Lallemand dry and treated it as I would a liquid pitch.  BTW this is probably the current front runner in my search for a new house ale yeast.
Rob Stein
Akron, Ohio

I'd rather have questions I can't answer than answers I can't question.

Offline Robert

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Re: s04 and other fast strains
« Reply #14 on: February 27, 2019, 03:12:40 PM »
FWIW, I've got a batch now with BRY-97.   The interwebs will assure you that this strain has a 24-48 hour lag time and is very slow thereafter.   It was active at 5 hours, and at 42 hours is at 62% AA and still rocking and rolling fast, low to mid 60°s fermentation  temperature throughout.  Exactly like every other ale fermentation I have with other strains.  It's probably not so much the strain as wort composition,  yeast health,  pitch rate and so on that determines fermentation rate.

That is remarkable. I have waited three daze for Bry-97 to kick off before. Once it gets going I’ve had great results.

How did you pitch the yeast?


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Propped it up.  Seems to alleviate most of the problems I've encountered with most dry yeasts in the first generation. (Though Notty propped up still sucks in the first generation IMO,  so I think I'm done with it.  But that's another topic.)  Removes the potential convenience, but I'm looking at dry yeast simply as another way to get a new culture,  and since there  is apparently no liquid culture of BRY-97 available at present, I got the Lallemand dry and treated it as I would a liquid pitch.  BTW this is probably the current front runner in my search for a new house ale yeast.
Seems to have finished sometime yesterday (in about 3-3 1/2 days) at 78.5% AA.  Will give it a few more days before crashing. Depending on how it performs in a repitch, I may have a provisional winner.
Rob Stein
Akron, Ohio

I'd rather have questions I can't answer than answers I can't question.