Author Topic: scotch  (Read 4981 times)

Offline Mikey

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Re: scotch
« Reply #15 on: October 23, 2010, 09:44:23 PM »
Layer some CO2 or other inert gas (Argon is also good) on top and it shouldn't oxidize.
« Last Edit: October 23, 2010, 09:46:03 PM by Brewmaster_Mikey »

Offline MrNate

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Re: scotch
« Reply #16 on: October 23, 2010, 10:46:14 PM »
I like Weaze's suggestion better.
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Online tschmidlin

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Re: scotch
« Reply #17 on: October 23, 2010, 10:59:27 PM »
Also, once you open it, drink it up. When the cap is off, and you pour it, it will oxidize, just like beer. Don't pour a couple glasses, and then shelf it for a couple more years. down the hatch ,with it!!
I don't think you need to worry about oxidation with whisky.  Some liqueurs have that problem, but most liquors don't.  In the case of that bottle, it's been sitting in a barrel for at least 10 years getting oxidized - how much more will it change in a closed bottle in your cabinet for several more years?  My bet is not that much, if at all - anything that was going to be oxidized probably already is.

but by all means euge, drink it as fast as you like :)
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Offline tumarkin

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Re: scotch
« Reply #18 on: October 24, 2010, 05:32:51 AM »
Also, once you open it, drink it up. When the cap is off, and you pour it, it will oxidize, just like beer. Don't pour a couple glasses, and then shelf it for a couple more years. down the hatch ,with it!!
I don't think you need to worry about oxidation with whisky.  Some liqueurs have that problem, but most liquors don't.  In the case of that bottle, it's been sitting in a barrel for at least 10 years getting oxidized - how much more will it change in a closed bottle in your cabinet for several more years?  My bet is not that much, if at all - anything that was going to be oxidized probably already is.

but by all means euge, drink it as fast as you like :)

+1,  while there there are some dissenting opinions on this... the consensus seems to be that whisky won't oxidize or lose quality in the bottle. at least as long as it is well sealed. most whisky is corked. if the cork starts to look bad, just replace it with another that fits well.

used to be I'd only have one or two whiskies at a time and I'd drink them up in reasonably short order. over the years, as I've gotten to like whisky more, my bar has grown. I'm a drinker not a collector though, so I don't have any that last more than a few years. I've not seen any noticeable effects from sitting in the bottle.

here is a link to a discussion among whisky bloggers on this question.....
http://www.whisky-emporium.com/Blogs/2010-10-Oct/WhiskyRT.htm

here's a link to a group of "the best whisky blogs" ....
http://www.connosr.com/blog/features/top-whisky-blog-awards/
Mark Tumarkin
Hogtown Brewers
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Offline tubercle

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Re: scotch
« Reply #19 on: October 24, 2010, 05:41:23 AM »
Whiskey bottle lids are made to keep dust out between pours.
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Offline weazletoe

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Re: scotch
« Reply #20 on: October 24, 2010, 08:50:56 AM »
I have no expierence with the problem, as mine always seems to diappear. I was just stating what I had head on the history channel, referred to in "that other thread".  The whiskey expert on there did say he was not concerned till maybe half the bottle was gone. With half a bottle left, he said he would call his buddies over, and kill the rest, so it was no wasted. (insert your own wasted joke here)
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Offline kerneldustjacket

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Re: scotch
« Reply #21 on: October 25, 2010, 02:27:26 PM »
+1 on splashing in a little water to bring out its bouquet...just make sure its a good quality water...something on the soft side (low mineral).
« Last Edit: October 25, 2010, 02:29:04 PM by kerneldustjacket »
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Offline euge

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Re: scotch
« Reply #22 on: October 25, 2010, 02:51:36 PM »
+1 on splashing in a little water to bring out its bouquet...just make sure its a good quality water...something on the soft side (low mineral).


I've been adding a single cube of RO ice to about a finger of scotch (or bourbon) and I'm liking it.
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Offline euge

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Re: scotch
« Reply #23 on: November 07, 2010, 12:18:20 AM »
+1 on splashing in a little water to bring out its bouquet...just make sure its a good quality water...something on the soft side (low mineral).


I've been adding a single cube of RO ice to about a finger of scotch (or bourbon) and I'm liking it.

Did I just double-quote myself?   ;D

I'm finding it's a waste of time to pour one finger of scotch. Scaled it up and using two cubes of ice now. I'm getting the fruity roastyness of it all. It has a long finish. Maybe I'll add a bit more and see...
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Offline theoman

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Re: scotch
« Reply #24 on: November 07, 2010, 03:05:06 AM »
+1 on splashing in a little water to bring out its bouquet...just make sure its a good quality water...something on the soft side (low mineral).


I've been adding a single cube of RO ice to about a finger of scotch (or bourbon) and I'm liking it.

Have you tried it neat with just a splash of water? Go pick your favorite barley wine and chill it until it's ice cold, then drink it up quickly. What's the point, right? All the complexity is dead. Same deal with scotch.

I love how even the smokiest scotch will leave behind more and more fruity/sweet/butterscotch aromas as you drink it. Sometimes I'll leave my glass unrinsed overnight just so I can smell it in the morning.

Offline tumarkin

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Re: scotch
« Reply #25 on: November 07, 2010, 05:52:24 AM »
+1 on splashing in a little water to bring out its bouquet...just make sure its a good quality water...something on the soft side (low mineral).


I've been adding a single cube of RO ice to about a finger of scotch (or bourbon) and I'm liking it.

Have you tried it neat with just a splash of water? Go pick your favorite barley wine and chill it until it's ice cold, then drink it up quickly. What's the point, right? All the complexity is dead. Same deal with scotch.

I love how even the smokiest scotch will leave behind more and more fruity/sweet/butterscotch aromas as you drink it. Sometimes I'll leave my glass unrinsed overnight just so I can smell it in the morning.

+1  Just a very small splash of water will open up the whisky, but too much will drown it, water down the mouthfeel & flavor. The only time I use more than a few drops is in a cask strength whisky. but that said.... it's all personal taste. but do try it with just a splash... you can add more if you like, but you can't take it back out. well, I guess you could just add more whisky  :D

and +1 on leaving the glass till the next morning. I'm used to hand washing my beer glasses, and I usually do it right away. I bought some nice glaincairn whisky glasses a number of years back, and so I hand wash those too. Everything else goes in the dishwasher. Well, one night I just left the whisky glass on the kitchen counter after a late-night dram of Springbank. When I came into the kitchen the next morning I could smell the malty richness across the room. What a pleasant surprise.

That's a testament to how a whisky opens up and changes. Drink it slow, linger over it and appreciate it. The Water of Life is truly a gift and a blessing.
Mark Tumarkin
Hogtown Brewers
Gainesville, FL

jaybeerman

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Re: scotch
« Reply #26 on: November 07, 2010, 12:29:24 PM »
Sometimes I'll leave my glass unrinsed overnight just so I can smell it in the morning.

+1.  Though it sounds kinda dirty when you say it like that. :D

I have changed my method recently.  I now go with one to two fingers with a single filtered water ice cube.  I prefer the character of the completely warm scotch but I've found that I like the transition too.  A few sips are taken along the way but most of the consumption comes after the coolness is fading away.
« Last Edit: November 07, 2010, 12:35:26 PM by jaybeerman »

Offline tumarkin

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Re: scotch
« Reply #27 on: November 07, 2010, 01:34:21 PM »
if you like your scotch cool (maybe on a hot day) but don't want it watered down, there is another alternative. I forget where I saw it, but one of the distilleries (iirc i might have been one of the Isla distilleries) was selling 'Scotch Rocks.' You'd put the authentic scotch rocks in your freezer, then put in your glass. no dilution. I'd bet a red white & blue american river rock would also do the trick.

It's interesting that bourbon is almost always taken on the rocks, but scotch is usually taken neat. Difference between climates?
Mark Tumarkin
Hogtown Brewers
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Offline tmbkr9

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Re: scotch
« Reply #28 on: November 07, 2010, 01:58:05 PM »
Consider trying a shot or so  with an ounce or two of the first runnings of a brown ale.  This is excellent with a more peaty scotch but it should work well with a speyside as well.

Offline euge

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Re: scotch
« Reply #29 on: November 08, 2010, 01:09:09 AM »
Nice two finger splash of the Speyburn @71F. Then added 10ml of pure water. Taste. Add 5ml more. It's what I'm drinking now. It coats your tongue. Really opens it up. There's a dry lingering finish. And I do mean dry... A lot going on there. Woody oaky tones. Smoky. Sweet. Some sour citrusy caramel notes. Will I be tasting this in the morning?

Water's nice. With ice a totally different drink. Hands down. My conclusion. Both good. Boeuf.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

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