Author Topic: Stuffed meat  (Read 2228 times)

Offline euge

  • I must live here
  • **********
  • Posts: 8022
  • Ego ceruisam ad bibere cervisiam
    • View Profile
Stuffed meat
« on: September 22, 2010, 06:24:32 PM »
Cornbread stuffed pork-chop.

I was in a a hurry so bought a Jalapeño Pecan stuffed pork-chop on the way home. Put it in the BGE for 45 minutes at 325F till internal temp was 175F. Normally I'll shoot for an internal of 165, but I don't trust "stuffing" at those temps.

Rested for ten minutes and it was delicioso! Bought it from the butcher prepared so that's cheating a bit but the end result was good. It went solo no sides...



I think next time with a side of field greens and a simple vinaigrette (raspberry?) will do the trick.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Laws are spider-webs, which catch the little flies, but cannot hold the big ones. -Anacharsis

Offline The Professor

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 863
  • "In the next life, you're on your own"
    • View Profile
Re: Stuffed meat
« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2010, 01:15:37 AM »
Cornbread stuffed pork-chop.

I was in a a hurry so bought a Jalapeño Pecan stuffed pork-chop on the way home. Put it in the BGE for 45 minutes at 325F till internal temp was 175F. Normally I'll shoot for an internal of 165, but I don't trust "stuffing" at those temps.

Rested for ten minutes and it was delicioso! Bought it from the butcher prepared so that's cheating a bit but the end result was good. It went solo no sides...

I think next time with a side of field greens and a simple vinaigrette (raspberry?) will do the trick.

Nice.
I make a   vinaigrette with walnut oil, balsamic vinegar,and either  strawberry or raspberry  conserves;  I bet that would go nicely with this one.

Looks scrumptious!
AL
New Brunswick, NJ
[499.6, 101.2] Apparent Rennerian
Homebrewer since July 1971

Offline euge

  • I must live here
  • **********
  • Posts: 8022
  • Ego ceruisam ad bibere cervisiam
    • View Profile
Re: Stuffed meat
« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2010, 10:04:36 AM »
It was.

How about this?

Boudin stuffed charcoal roasted Chicken.

Like a vulture I went for the pope's nose. Then the wings. The smoky boudin marries well with the crunchy fatty chicken. Just salt and pepper inside and out, and the stuffing.

Enjoy the food pron.










The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Laws are spider-webs, which catch the little flies, but cannot hold the big ones. -Anacharsis

Offline capozzoli

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1689
  • Lat 40* 6 m. 2.24 s. Long -74* 51 m. 21.75 s.
    • View Profile
    • Capozzoli Metalworks
Re: Stuffed meat
« Reply #3 on: September 23, 2010, 11:56:23 PM »
Very nice. The boudin looks a little gray though is that normal?

The pope's nose, funny.

Thats the pooper right. Makes sense.
Beer, its whats for dinner.

http://theholyravioli.blogspot.com/

http:// www.thecapo.us

Offline bluesman

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 8825
  • Delaware
    • View Profile
Re: Stuffed meat
« Reply #4 on: September 24, 2010, 01:43:43 AM »
Very nice job on the bird.  Looks tasty. We need a drooling emoticon.  :D 

I assume you qued it up on the egg eh?  8)

Rotisserie...
Ron Price

Offline nicneufeld

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1049
    • View Profile
Re: Stuffed meat
« Reply #5 on: September 24, 2010, 02:34:01 AM »
Beautiful bird that!

I love roasted chicken.  I also love the flavor of stocks, soups, and gravies made with REAL chicken, not bouillon cubes, boxed commercial "chicken stock", canned chicken broth, or any of that garbage (bouillon cubes have their place, but only in certain things).  So this weekend I'm going to do a soup, or perhaps, thickened to a fricassee, with a whole chicken.  True, honest to god chicken broth, with vegetables, herbs, and seasoning.  It's very simple (very English, even) but delightful, particularly as the weather cools.

Offline euge

  • I must live here
  • **********
  • Posts: 8022
  • Ego ceruisam ad bibere cervisiam
    • View Profile
Re: Stuffed meat
« Reply #6 on: September 24, 2010, 07:37:59 AM »
Cap the rice can get a bit grey. The pink is the pork liver. There's all sorts of boudin. But in this case it's taaaasty. :D

Geez the egg is amazing. Easy to use it and the whole chicken was the seventh cook. I did it at 375. I was going to try and do 7 days of stuffed meat but just can't do it. Too tired. There was whole pork loin at the store (longer and bigger than my arm) for $1.88 per when I got the chicken. Want to stuff it with jalapeño sausage but man that's a lot of lean meat. Maybe they'll cut me some.

I'm a big soup guy, and a chicken stock might be in my future this weekend. Wings supposedly make great stock. But it's probably cheaper to buy a whole chicken.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Laws are spider-webs, which catch the little flies, but cannot hold the big ones. -Anacharsis

Offline nicneufeld

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1049
    • View Profile
Re: Stuffed meat
« Reply #7 on: September 24, 2010, 05:06:30 PM »
I'm a big soup guy, and a chicken stock might be in my future this weekend. Wings supposedly make great stock. But it's probably cheaper to buy a whole chicken.

Yeah, like ribs and brisket, wings are a cut that normally was considered "junk" but has become popular enough to be overinflated in price!  Wings do make good stock, but only because they have plenty of bones and fat...and there's plenty of both on chicken, once you get away from the breastmeat.  Backbones, trimmings, and all the rest make great stock too.  For the price of a package of cut wings you could get a whole chicken, cut out two chicken breasts, two thighs, and two legs for other purposes, and have the rest of the carcass, plus two wings, to make a great stock.

Offline Slowbrew

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2432
  • The Slowly Losing IT Brewery in Urbandale, IA
    • View Profile
Re: Stuffed meat
« Reply #8 on: September 24, 2010, 05:20:46 PM »
My kids like a lot of meat in the soup so I just throw the whole bird in a couple gallons water with salt and pepper to start.  I normally get the whole chickens at Sam's.  Two whole birds in one pack from Tyson for some insanely low price.

Add celery, long grain wild rice, barley, carrots and whatever other veggies are around the house, spice to your liking and you have a meal in one pot.  Toss in egg noodles with enough time before serving and the kids rave about it for days.  The retired neighbors next door get 2 of 3 quarts too.  Keeps them happy.  ;D

Paul
Where the heck are we going?  And what's with this hand basket?

Offline ullarsskald1989

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 46
  • Brewing since 1974, brewing well since 1975
    • View Profile
Re: Stuffed meat
« Reply #9 on: September 25, 2010, 05:10:21 PM »
Braciola (pronounced in our family as breh' zjole) is one of my favorite things to make and eat.



The stuffing ingredients can be varied as the list of foods which compliment the flavor of beef: Italian sausage (hot and sweet) with mushrooms - Mozzarella and mushroom (diced Portabella, Porcini and Oyster) - Popcorn shrimp and smoked ham - Mixed Italian cheeses and whole hard-boiled egg - Mixed Italian cheeses, diced tomatoes and pepperoni - shredded celery, carrots, mushroom and onion

The variety of tastes in the Braciola can be as simple or complex as the cook likes (like our brews).

This one is filled with mushrooms cheeses, onion and peppers.  You can also use smaller pieces of thin sliced steak to make individual Braciola...

   1. Take a large flank steak (as close to 2# as possible) and butterfly it (cut it through the thickness, across the grain so it lays flat like the leaves of a book).
   2. Pound the steak with a coarse meat mallet to help tenderize and stretch it out.
   3. Season the meat on both sides with a light sprinkling of salt, ground pepper (black, white, cayenne and sweet paprika), oregano, sweet basil and onion & garlic powders.
   4. Roll up the meat in plastic wrap and let it "marinate" in the refrigerator while the stuffing is prepared.
   5. Mix together: 1 c chopped white mushrooms (flavored with 2 T of rehydrated, chopped Porcinis), 3/4 c shredded, low moisture Mozzarella, 1/4 c each, freshly grated Asiago, Romano and Parmesan, 1 ea sm yellow and red onion - diced, 1/2 c ea green, yellow and red Bell peppers - diced. Don't worry if this seems too much, the excess is spread over the outside of the Braciola when it is placed in the baking dish.
   6. Lay out the meat, place 2/3 of the stuffing alongside the center line of the steak. Fold this side of the meat over and roll the rest of the steak around this pocket. Tuck the ends in and secure the roll with cotton butcher's cord.
   7. Preheat the oven to 350F.
   8. In a hot pan, pour in just enough olive oil to cover the bottom. Sear the meat all around.
   9. Place the browned meat roll into a lightly oiled baking pan. Spread the rest of the stuffing over it. Drizzle on a little olive oil and red wine. Bake covered for 30 to 40 minutes, or until done to taste (I like mine medium rare).
  10. Slice into 1" (approx.) portions.

Serve over fresh-baked flat bread with steamed spinach and black olives (dressed with olive oil, lemon juice and crushed garlic).

If you like sauce, cover the whole with 1# each diced and crushed tomatoes (Roma or Plum), and then the rest of the fill-mix before baking, also sprinkle with some fresh, minced basil and oregano.  Serve over macaroni or spaghetti.

If you want to skip the meat for some reason or other ( :D ) use the stuffing mix (seasoned with the spices normally used on the meat) as the filling in a pair of double crust pies and use a little extra grated cheese as a topper. Bake at 325F for 45 to 50 minutes, until golden brown. (Wrap the crust rim in aluminum foil to prevent overcooking.) The finished pie is wonderfully complimented by spinach and olives (as above), almonds and figs.

"Drink what you like." - Justin Wilson
Today is a good day; to learn, to do, to love, to be...

(Ale - 1974, Wine - 1975, Mead - 1983)

Steven P Robinson, AHA Member #175298

Offline euge

  • I must live here
  • **********
  • Posts: 8022
  • Ego ceruisam ad bibere cervisiam
    • View Profile
Re: Stuffed meat
« Reply #10 on: September 25, 2010, 07:18:27 PM »
That looks phenomenal! I was thinking of a Roulade. This is doable.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Laws are spider-webs, which catch the little flies, but cannot hold the big ones. -Anacharsis

Offline euge

  • I must live here
  • **********
  • Posts: 8022
  • Ego ceruisam ad bibere cervisiam
    • View Profile
Re: Stuffed meat
« Reply #11 on: September 27, 2010, 06:45:50 PM »
Stuffed Pork-loin! With Bratwurst! Inspired by Deepsouth (I think)...

Cook at 275-325 for 30-40 minutes per pound until interior temp of 155F. Remove and rest for 30 minutes. Slice and serve. Mine will end up on sandwiches for lunch or dinner.





In ma belly!



I've got four more roasts like this prepared and frozen.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Laws are spider-webs, which catch the little flies, but cannot hold the big ones. -Anacharsis

Offline tschmidlin

  • I must live here
  • **********
  • Posts: 8198
  • Redmond, WA
    • View Profile
Re: Stuffed meat
« Reply #12 on: September 27, 2010, 07:46:17 PM »
Looks so good guys!  I won't have time to grill or smoke any big pieces of meat for a while, but might get some smaller things cooked.  I'll probably smoke some sausages later this week.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline markaberrant

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 251
  • Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada
    • View Profile
    • ALES Club
Re: Stuffed meat
« Reply #13 on: September 27, 2010, 09:56:42 PM »
Stuffed Pork-loin! With Bratwurst! Inspired by Deepsouth (I think)...

For our homebrew club windup BBQ 2 years ago, we made ukranian sausage stuffed porkloin wrapped in bacon.  It was glorious.

Offline capozzoli

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1689
  • Lat 40* 6 m. 2.24 s. Long -74* 51 m. 21.75 s.
    • View Profile
    • Capozzoli Metalworks
Re: Stuffed meat
« Reply #14 on: September 27, 2010, 10:34:35 PM »
Fabulous!

Not so much the meat, all of that does look awesome though; but euge's fingernails. How do you keep them so nice. You must let us know your secret.
Beer, its whats for dinner.

http://theholyravioli.blogspot.com/

http:// www.thecapo.us