Author Topic: European malt extract  (Read 979 times)

Offline euge

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European malt extract
« on: October 04, 2010, 06:58:43 PM »
I'm thinking of returning in part extract brewing. So far my experience has been primarily with Briess or maybe Cargill.  How different is the European malt extracts for flavor and are they worth the additional expense?

Would steeping European specialty grains make up any difference if used in conjunction with domestic malt extract?
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline denny

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Re: European malt extract
« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2010, 08:22:11 AM »
I've used Weyermann Munich and rauch extracts.  I thought that both were very good.  But since I've never used any other Munich or rauch extracts, I can't compare directly.
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: European malt extract
« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2010, 08:42:51 AM »
Where did you find the rauch extract?  That could be fun, do you think the resulting beer is more smoky than using all rauch malt?  I'm wondering if the freshness of the malt when they make the extract helps preserve the smoke.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline denny

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Re: European malt extract
« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2010, 10:19:53 AM »
It was at my LHBS, on the shelf in a red plastic jug.  I'm not at all a smoked beer fan, but I bought some and brewed one just to see what the extract was like.  Pretty good, IIRC.  But I've never made one AG so I can't compare.
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: European malt extract
« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2010, 10:24:04 AM »
It was at my LHBS, on the shelf in a red plastic jug.  I'm not at all a smoked beer fan, but I bought some and brewed one just to see what the extract was like.  Pretty good, IIRC.  But I've never made one AG so I can't compare.
Cool, thanks.

I make a dopplebock with 100% weyerman rauch malt, and I once entered it and the judges said I needed to use a higher percentage of rauch malt.   ::)
Tom Schmidlin

Offline jeffy

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Re: European malt extract
« Reply #5 on: October 05, 2010, 10:30:52 AM »
I get that a lot, too, even with 80% home-smoked malt.  'Worst comment I ever got on a smoked beer was "obviously used liquid smoke."  That hurt.
Lately I've been making a nearly 100% home-smoked beer and blending it back later with a maltier, non-smoked beer.
I've never even heard of Weyerman Rauch Extract.
Sorry I can't help with the original question about European extracts.
Jeff Gladish, Tampa (989.3, 175.1 Apparent Rennarian)
Homebrewing since 1990
AHA member since 1991, now a lifetime member
BJCP judge since 1995

Offline euge

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Re: European malt extract
« Reply #6 on: October 05, 2010, 10:50:29 AM »
So far I've located: Bierkeller, Muntons, and John Bull. Thought I'd seen more in the past.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline denny

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Re: European malt extract
« Reply #7 on: October 05, 2010, 01:41:41 PM »
Having used John Bull, I'd say move on....the JB seemed especially unfermentable.  Look for these...

http://www.weyermann.de/usa/produkte.asp?PN=1&idkat=175&umenue=yes&idmenue=269&sprache=10
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Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: European malt extract
« Reply #8 on: October 05, 2010, 03:04:29 PM »
I've had good experience with Munton's DME.  These days I'm using mostly Briess Pilsner DME, or Golden Light perhaps.  Munton's, I think, may be maltier and perhaps a bit less fermentable.

My approach is to go with the lightest possible extract I can find as a base.

I typically do a partial mash to improve on the extract with style specific grains.

IMO it works quite well that way.  Of course, the majority of what I've been brewing the last few years are tripels so the Pilsner DME is appropriate...  Regardless, I use this approach without regard to style.

Also, some if not all of the on-line places sell style "specialty" liquid extracts (ie. Pilsner, American light, European stout etc.)  I've no particular experience with these.
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Offline Malticulous

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Re: European malt extract
« Reply #9 on: October 05, 2010, 05:46:41 PM »
I've noticed Williams claims many of their extracts are made from European malts.

http://www.williamsbrewing.com/SYRUP_MALT_EXTRACT_HONEY_C99.cfm

I've not used them.