Author Topic: Hummingbirds are smart critters  (Read 5832 times)

Offline gmac

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Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
« Reply #60 on: May 21, 2011, 08:52:22 AM »
Bacon comes from the belly regardless of where you live.
Bacon in Ireland and the UK is back bacon, but not quite the same as in Canada.  It's pork loin but with an extra bit on it.  If you want belly bacon in Ireland/UK, you need to ask for streaky bacon.
I stand corrected.  I wasn't thinking off-continent. 

Offline Steve

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Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
« Reply #61 on: May 22, 2011, 09:13:19 AM »


(They're not Canadian Geese, they're Canada Geese).

This was one of my pet peeves when I taught my field ornithology class.  Sadly, most of the students never quite got it.

If I were north of the US border and someone there were to grab me between my butt cheeks and squeeze hard several times, would that be a Canada Geese or Canadian Gooses?
Steve
 
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Offline punatic

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Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
« Reply #62 on: May 22, 2011, 12:27:47 PM »


(They're not Canadian Geese, they're Canada Geese).

This was one of my pet peeves when I taught my field ornithology class.  Sadly, most of the students never quite got it.

If I were north of the US border and someone there were to grab me between my butt cheeks and squeeze hard several times, would that be a Canada Geese or Canadian Gooses?

I think that depends on whether you enjoyed it or not.
« Last Edit: May 22, 2011, 12:29:58 PM by punatic »
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Offline thomasbarnes

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Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
« Reply #63 on: May 24, 2011, 01:36:13 AM »
Canada Geese but more commonly called Sky Rats here.  Stupid things are everywhere.  Green tootsie rolls on every golf course, park and lawn near water.

And the problem is that since they're technically "migratory waterfowl" they're under state and federal protection, so its difficult for property owners or local authorities to do anything about them. In more temperate climates, the only way the damn things will actually migrate is if you buy them a 1st class plane ticket to Miami.[/quote]

Offline thomasbarnes

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Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
« Reply #64 on: May 24, 2011, 01:39:52 AM »
If you watch Strange Brew (and you should) you'll hear Bob say the following during the court scene..."I'll have a toasted back bacon...hold the toast".

And, if you've ever seen their Great White North skits on SCTV, you'll notice that they have a little grill on the coffee table, just for grilling back bacon. Pretty smart, eh? Almost as smart as raising baby mice inside beer bottles.

Offline gmac

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Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
« Reply #65 on: May 24, 2011, 08:47:40 AM »
Canada Geese but more commonly called Sky Rats here.  Stupid things are everywhere.  Green tootsie rolls on every golf course, park and lawn near water.

And the problem is that since they're technically "migratory waterfowl" they're under state and federal protection, so its difficult for property owners or local authorities to do anything about them. In more temperate climates, the only way the damn things will actually migrate is if you buy them a 1st class plane ticket to Miami.
[/quote]

What they do here is spray the eggs with mineral oil.  If you break them, they'll lay more but if you spray them with oil, the egg will sufficate and won't hatch and they'll still sit on them without laying new ones.  Personally, I think they should do a cull and donate the meat to food banks etc but most people think I'm cold-hearted.  Plus, people probably wouldn't eat them.  I do, taste like goose.

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
« Reply #66 on: May 24, 2011, 09:11:09 AM »
But it's time to put the feeder away.  Last night the dog went crazy around 2:30 AM.  We didn't see anything, but this morning I noticed the bottom was ripped off the feeder and the wrought-iron pole is bent about 15 degrees.  I think the dog scared it off before it was finished, but the only thing I can think of that can and would do that is a bear.  They've been seen in our neighborhood before, but never in our yard.  I figured the smell of the dog would keep them away, but the smell of the sunflower seeds was more attractive I guess.
I meant to post a followup . . . I don't know if this was the same bear (or if we even had a bear, since I never saw it) but this article appeared in the local free paper.  As a point of reference, it was 2:30 AM Tuesday when the dog woke us up.

Black bear's eventful Eastside journey ends in Bothell

A bear's eventful journey through Eastside cities ended in Bothell Wednesday night.
The young black bear, first spotted in Redmond Tuesday morning . . .
Tom Schmidlin

ccarlson

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Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
« Reply #67 on: May 24, 2011, 09:24:52 AM »
But it's time to put the feeder away.  Last night the dog went crazy around 2:30 AM.  We didn't see anything, but this morning I noticed the bottom was ripped off the feeder and the wrought-iron pole is bent about 15 degrees.  I think the dog scared it off before it was finished, but the only thing I can think of that can and would do that is a bear.  They've been seen in our neighborhood before, but never in our yard.  I figured the smell of the dog would keep them away, but the smell of the sunflower seeds was more attractive I guess.
I meant to post a followup . . . I don't know if this was the same bear (or if we even had a bear, since I never saw it) but this article appeared in the local free paper.  As a point of reference, it was 2:30 AM Tuesday when the dog woke us up.

Black bear's eventful Eastside journey ends in Bothell

A bear's eventful journey through Eastside cities ended in Bothell Wednesday night.
The young black bear, first spotted in Redmond Tuesday morning . . .


I initially misread Bothell as Brothel and I imagined a bunch of naked people running out of a house with a black bear behind them. :)

Offline punatic

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Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
« Reply #68 on: May 24, 2011, 09:33:48 AM »
But it's time to put the feeder away.  Last night the dog went crazy around 2:30 AM.  We didn't see anything, but this morning I noticed the bottom was ripped off the feeder and the wrought-iron pole is bent about 15 degrees.  I think the dog scared it off before it was finished, but the only thing I can think of that can and would do that is a bear.  They've been seen in our neighborhood before, but never in our yard.  I figured the smell of the dog would keep them away, but the smell of the sunflower seeds was more attractive I guess.
I meant to post a followup . . . I don't know if this was the same bear (or if we even had a bear, since I never saw it) but this article appeared in the local free paper.  As a point of reference, it was 2:30 AM Tuesday when the dog woke us up.

Black bear's eventful Eastside journey ends in Bothell

A bear's eventful journey through Eastside cities ended in Bothell Wednesday night.
The young black bear, first spotted in Redmond Tuesday morning . . .


How did it end; when the bear found a Canada goose eating back bacon?

Ka loo koo koo koo koo koo koooo,
Ka loo koo koo koo koo koo koooooo!
There is only one success: to be able to spend your life in your own way.


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