Author Topic: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing  (Read 80720 times)

Offline Stevie

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #1380 on: July 11, 2017, 03:47:34 AM »
You need to shake it extremely hard for at least 2-3 minutes. Then leave it alone for 10 minutes. Then open it. Be ready to dump it in the container you will use, eg, Erlenmeyer flask.

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You're joking?

Offline lupulus

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #1381 on: July 11, 2017, 04:00:23 AM »
No.  When in glass you can see it when it unglues from the bottom but in a can you need to make sure it is mixed. Alternatively if you are dumping in a starter you can transfer back and forth  until you transfer it all.

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Offline Stevie

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #1382 on: July 11, 2017, 04:19:29 AM »
No.  When in glass you can see it when it unglues from the bottom but in a can you need to make sure it is mixed. Alternatively if you are dumping in a starter you can transfer back and forth  until you transfer it all.

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Sounds like a recipe for yeast face. I haven't messed with any of the thick strains.

Offline coolman26

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #1383 on: July 11, 2017, 02:18:31 PM »
My mistake was shaking it and not waiting long enough before popping the top. The first time using anything is a learning experience. I think the next time I use it, I will cover it and rinse into a small starter for harvest.


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Jeff B

Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #1384 on: July 11, 2017, 03:01:30 PM »
IMO, if you need to learn how to use the packaging, there's an issue.  This should be simple.

Also, if you need to introduce something to stir up the yeast, that just adds another point for contamination and seems like poor planning (to me) from a packaging standpoint.
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Offline Stevie

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #1385 on: July 11, 2017, 03:07:18 PM »
Maybe they should include a widget to help bust up the clog

Offline lupulus

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #1386 on: July 11, 2017, 03:42:28 PM »
IMO, if you need to learn how to use the packaging, there's an issue.  This should be simple.

Also, if you need to introduce something to stir up the yeast, that just adds another point for contamination and seems like poor planning (to me) from a packaging standpoint.
You are right of course but you can get stuck yeast in the Wyeast packs or new WLP packs if you do not agitate/ shake. At least you can apply pressure to dissolve the yeast.

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Offline bayareabrewer

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #1387 on: July 11, 2017, 03:47:08 PM »
IMO, if you need to learn how to use the packaging, there's an issue.  This should be simple.

Also, if you need to introduce something to stir up the yeast, that just adds another point for contamination and seems like poor planning (to me) from a packaging standpoint.

I used their fullers strain and it was a nightmare. That stuff sticks like glue to the metal can. I really like that company and for other strains the packaging aint that big of a deal. You gotta learn to use wyeast packaging as well IMO.

Offline PORTERHAUS

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #1388 on: September 07, 2017, 02:13:32 AM »
So it's been pretty quiet for awhile, I realize most of the talk is on our forums but I know people here are still trying things and interested. We are still trying to perfect this stuff, and working diligently to streamline and enhance the method.

Where does everyone here stand on their efforts? Any questions?

I can't possibly read through the 100's of pages on this topic that is spread over this forums but I do have a question and I'm sure it's been answered or talked about. But if someone is trying to make improvements, can and will you see improvement or is there truth that is there is a need to implement this 100% or it's wash?

To answer your question where some of us are at. I'm brand new to this, but want to try it, at least for certain beers. I just brewed an Oktoberfest. I pre-boiled my strike and sparge water, dosed with NaMeta, cooled, then transferred my strike water to the mash first tun via the ball valve on my kettle with a piece of tubing so not to splash. I doughed in gently, capped the mash with foil. I batch sparged, but was unable to transfer my sparge water in the same method at this time, but I will when I install a ball valve. I was careful running off to the boil kettle, kept a gentle boil, lower than in the past. I chill with a copper immersion chiller, it was my bday gift last year and was over $100, I don't think I'll be replacing that soon. lol

Things I have noticed:
Lower mash ph, lower boil ph.
I did notice less brewhouse aroma while brewing.
Mash samples tasted cleaner, crisper, not as sweet. Very clear run off to the kettle.
Cleaner hot break foam, not as gunky...but a nice pure white foam.
Very nice cold break, very clear wort into the fermenter.
Post boil wort tasted just as good as always, just not as sweet and more defined aroma.
(So is this my imagination?)

The beer is still fermenting in a corny keg where I will be able to do a closed transfer. I'm looking forward to this finished beer and tasting the results/improvements. I HAVE noticed and tasted oxidation in my beers. For a long time I always felt I just couldn't brew good hoppy beers. Many batches come out quite darker compared to how they looked when brewed or kegged. Hop flavor fade fast, never quite feel I get good hop character. Most noticable is a honey like sweetness...beers sometimes dont' seem as clean, crisp and there is lack of fresh malt character. So I have been slowly making better attempts to not introduce any more oxygen if I can help it.

This has been a lot of good information, it all makes a lot of sense to me and I am in need of making some adjustments. I do not want to go anal over this, but I'm all for making better beer. My beers have much room for improvement. I appreciate the info here and the time you and others have put in to this. Coming to this forum was the best improvement to my beers to date. They can only get better from here. 

Offline JT

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #1389 on: September 07, 2017, 03:02:31 AM »
Gah!  I wish I hadn't missed the talk about Imperial Yeast, I could have weighed in earlier.  For those that want to know to avoid explosions and stuck yeast problems, here is a very simple tried and true method. 
1) keep it cold, up until you're ready to pitch.
2) do not shake.  Crack the lid a bit to equalize pressure, then peel it off. 
3) pour a bit into your carboy or vessel, stir the remainder with a sanitized spoon, and dump it in. 

No worries. 


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Offline PORTERHAUS

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #1390 on: September 09, 2017, 06:20:25 PM »
Another question is how does spunding affect the clearing of a beer? We have always heard about crash cooling, lagering or letting a bath drop clear before force carbonation. I have also read/heard carbonation can slow how a beer clears. Just something I'm curious about. Can some of you touch on that from experience?

Offline brewinhard

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #1391 on: September 09, 2017, 06:41:44 PM »
Another question is how does spunding affect the clearing of a beer? We have always heard about crash cooling, lagering or letting a bath drop clear before force carbonation. I have also read/heard carbonation can slow how a beer clears. Just something I'm curious about. Can some of you touch on that from experience?

When spunding, I have observed that clear beer can be had, but usually takes about 4 wks of lagering in the keg along with some pulls along the way to force out some of the sedimented yeast. This can vary in time of course and is most dependent on the yeast strain and how flocculent/powdery it is.
More recently, I purchased a couple clear beer systems and have used those on my beers that I want to drink faster and that don't typically get a long period of cold maturation. And I can say that on my very first pour out of the keg (usually just a few days after being in the fridge), the beer is just as clear as some of my beers that have been lagering for over 3-4 wks already. I am in no way affiliated with the clear beer system, but just wanted to provide my feedback.
Cheers! 

Offline PORTERHAUS

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #1392 on: September 10, 2017, 01:34:44 AM »
Thanks for that, I have a few things to try on the next batch. For those that do yeast deoxygenation has there been updated trials or experiments with that? How do you factor the yeast and sugar amounts...is it based on the volume of you are trying to treat? And finally can the yeast deoxygenation be set up the night before and left in a vessel to use the next morning? Is there diminishing returns if it was to sit out that long and start absorbing o2 again?

This has all peaked my interest again,just trying to catch up a bit. I want to try a few things since my I am started to taste and notice what oxidation is. I want to taste the difference. Setting up deoxygenated water beforehand to have ready will make this a no brainer.

Offline PORTERHAUS

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #1393 on: September 15, 2017, 05:05:38 PM »
I have read the need to adjust pH of the samples when using the Sulfite strips. Are they also temperature dependent?

Can you use them to test the final beer as well? I just ordered some strips to do some testing on the next brew day but was curious to text my lastest batch where I used SMB. Will carbonation and temperature impact the test strips if testing a sample of kegged finished beer?

Offline natebrews

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #1394 on: September 15, 2017, 06:20:19 PM »
There shouldn't be any left in the finished beer, unless the yeast produced it.  During oxygenation all the remaining sulfite should get used up before fermentation.

I don't know about temp dependence, I hope not. 
Risk of failure should be no deterrent to trying.